wfw weekend #369

view from the exhibition And She Will Say: Hi, Ailleurs, To Higher Grounds, LAURE PROUVOST
seen at Kunstmuseum Luzern
on Wednesday, December 21, 2016
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #368

New Life Shelves (Basel) (2016), CLIFFORD E.BRUCKMANN
seen in the group exhibition L’Etat Parfait
at Freymond-Guth Fine Arts, Basel
on Friday, December 23, 2016
image © we find wildness

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one pic friday. Rand Hardy

SideCar Garden, 2014
aqua resin painted, 28 x 32 x 45 in
image of the Courtesy the Artist and Clifford Gallery Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

Meanwhile, on yet another side of the planet, or Hamilton, New York, to be precise, a group exhibition entitled Sessile is currently presented at the art venue Clifford Gallery.

Th curator of the show, writer and artist JOSH MINKUS explained in the press release that the word Sessile refers ‘to organisms that fasten themselves to a substrate and stay there, like mussels, barnacles, or coral’. He added furthermore that ‘when observing mussels covering the rocks along a shoreline, we know the water was there and will return soon. The mussels, by staying put, articulate a boundary, and the indeterminacy of what can be called separate as land and sea’.

Basically the exhibition aims to underscore how the sculptures relate to the context they’re shown and to the base to which they’re attached.

Sessile with GIULIA CENCI, RAND HARDY, EVA LÖFDAHL, K.R.M. MOONEY, NICK RAFFEL is on view at Clifford Gallery (Colgate University) in Hamilton until February 15, 2017.

Domenico de Chirico for We Find Wildness #77

all images courtesy the artist and Nogueras Blanchard, Madrid

Solo, a solo exhibition by RUBÉN GRILO
on view at Nogueras Blanchard in Madrid
until January 14, 2017

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

Kate Mackeson & Henrik Potter. Landlords are currently not collecting rent in self love

Occupational Hygiene II (2016), KATE MACKESON
wine glass, spoon, uncooked egg, wax, wick, 23 cm x 27 cm x 22 cm

KATE MACKESON & HENRIK POTTER, Landlords are currently not collecting rent in self love
installation view at Cell Project, London, December 2016

Come and See (2016), HENRIK POTTER
closed cell polyethylene foam, pocket change, plastic object, metal objects, cigarette butts, paper clip, matches, jewellery, leaves, UV print on styrene, oil paint, moss, grass, perspex, display rings, aluminium frame, 200 cm x 100 cm x 5 cm

Come and See (2016), HENRIK POTTER
closed cell polyethylene foam, pocket change, plastic object, metal objects, cigarette butts, paper clip, matches, jewellery, leaves, UV print on styrene, oil paint, moss, grass, perspex, display rings, aluminium frame, 200 cm x 100 cm x 5 cm

Come and See (2016), HENRIK POTTER
closed cell polyethylene foam, pocket change, plastic object, metal objects, cigarette butts, paper clip, matches, jewellery, leaves, UV print on styrene, oil paint, moss, grass, perspex, display rings, aluminium frame, 200 cm x 100 cm x 5 cm

KATE MACKESON & HENRIK POTTER, Landlords are currently not collecting rent in self love
installation view at Cell Project, London, December 2016

Fugue State (2016), KATE MACKESON
wax, oil, collage on aluminium, silicon, uk to us & eu adaptors, eu to uk adaptor, hair straighteners, 46 cm x 60 cm x 40 cm

Fugue State (2016), KATE MACKESON
wax, oil, collage on aluminium, silicon, uk to us & eu adaptors, eu to uk adaptor, hair straighteners, 46 cm x 60 cm x 40 cm

KATE MACKESON & HENRIK POTTER, Landlords are currently not collecting rent in self love
installation view at Cell Project, London, December 2016

KATE MACKESON & HENRIK POTTER, Landlords are currently not collecting rent in self love
installation view at Cell Project, London, December 2016

all images courtesy of the artists and Cell Projects, London

 

‘Landlords are currently not collecting rent in self love’ is a story about coping with the everyday, a tale of precariousness and self-preservation, a play about the loss of communication. Based on the idea of uncertain co-existence, this exhibition brings together the work of two artists who may or may not share common ground.
The two artists in question are KATE MACKESON and HENRIK POTTER both based in London, where the exhibition Landlords are currently not collecting rent in self love is running at Cell Project until January 15, 2017

Yuri Pattison. Sunset Provision

YURI PATTISON, Sunset Provision
installation view at Mother Tankstation Limited, Dublin

(infinite corridor, infinite) Sunset Provision, 2016
Video (MIThenge 11/11/16 shot by Misha Sra for the artist, MIThenge 12/11/16 shot by Nick Gomez for the artist), Drift TV sunset filter, dust sheet

YURI PATTISON, Sunset Provision
installation view at Mother Tankstation Limited, Dublin

memory foam memory, 2016
Amazon basics memory foam mattress, light therapy mask, travel adapters, USB charger, LED panel & 15 minute dawn/dusk simulation dimmer, white noise sound conditioner, melatonin liquid & vaporiser, Unistrut
53.5(h) x 97(w) x 189(L) cm, LED panel from floor 245(h)cm

memory foam memory, 2016
Amazon basics memory foam mattress, light therapy mask, travel adapters, USB charger, LED panel & 15 minute dawn/dusk simulation dimmer, white noise sound conditioner, melatonin liquid & vaporiser, Unistrut
53.5(h) x 97(w) x 189(L) cm, LED panel from floor 245(h)cm

YURI PATTISON, Sunset Provision
installation view at Mother Tankstation Limited, Dublin

dust, scraper, fan 2.7 (winter)
dust, scraper, fan 2.8 (productivity)
dust, scraper, fan 2.9 (stack)
Custom made perspex 1U format server case, server PSUs, 40mm server case fans, practice locks, modafinil, 5-HTP, piracetam, anti-static bags, tape, inkjet print, cable ties, protective film, sebum, dust, 66 x 43 x 5cm each, 2016

dust, scraper, fan 2.7 (winter)
dust, scraper, fan 2.8 (productivity)
dust, scraper, fan 2.9 (stack)
Custom made perspex 1U format server case, server PSUs, 40mm server case fans, practice locks, modafinil, 5-HTP, piracetam, anti-static bags, tape, inkjet print, cable ties, protective film, sebum, dust, 66 x 43 x 5cm each, 2016

dust, scraper, fan 2.7 (winter)
dust, scraper, fan 2.8 (productivity)
dust, scraper, fan 2.9 (stack)
Custom made perspex 1U format server case, server PSUs, 40mm server case fans, practice locks, modafinil, 5-HTP, piracetam, anti-static bags, tape, inkjet print, cable ties, protective film, sebum, dust, 66 x 43 x 5cm each, 2016

memory foam remembers, 2016
Amazon basics memory foam & foam mattresses, light therapy mask, travel adapters, USB charger, silicon ear plugs, Philips Hue controller (evening sunset), LED panel, Prison android tablet with MIThenge simulation & f.lux software, Unistrut, 42(h) x 128(w) x 210(L) cm, LED panel from floor 245(h)cm

memory foam remembers, 2016
Amazon basics memory foam & foam mattresses, light therapy mask, travel adapters, USB charger, silicon ear plugs, Philips Hue controller (evening sunset), LED panel, Prison android tablet with MIThenge simulation & f.lux software, Unistrut, 42(h) x 128(w) x 210(L) cm, LED panel from floor 245(h)cm

all images courtesy of the artist and Mother’s Tankstation limited, Dublin

A few days ago I was reading about JOSH HARRIS, an internet entrepreneur often described as a visionary or pioneer. HARRIS became known for his experiments which tested the effects of media and technology on the development of personal identity. One of his projects is called “Quiet: We Live in Public,” a sort of big brother fantasy developed in the late ’90s and which placed more than 100 artists in a basement in New York City. During six months,   an army of webcams followed and captured every move the artists made.

Almost 20 years later, the performance that led HARRIS to mental collapse appears prophetic. We all live virtually on the Internet recording and sharing everyday a huge amount of  personal informations through devices. This technological lifestyle has some psychological and physiological effects on vital notions such as sleep. London-based artist YURI PATTISON has developed for the art venue Mother Tankstation Limited in Dublin, a body of work that focuses on this essential aspect.

According to the press release, PATTISON ‘isolated a particularly curious strain of interest in conquering the loneliest hours of day, creating proxy companions to help consumers through the few hours when no one can reach you; probing the developed market in recent years of monitoring applications and interfaces, sound emitters, and contouring foam, promising to both optimise and accompany your (literal) darkest time’. In other words, even in your deepest sleep, you are not alone. A multitude of products are conceived to record, help or analyse your most vulnerable moment of the day.

Sunset Provision by YURI PATTISON is on view at Mother Tankstation Limited in Dublin until January 21, 2017.

wfw weekend #367

Bouquet IX (2012), WILLEM DE ROOIJ
seen at MMK 2, Frankfurt am Main
on Thursday, December 15, 2016
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #366

Apotheke Mon Chéri (2016), ALEX TURGEON
seen in the group exhibition After Facts – Pudding Explosion Rearticulated
at Mendelssohnstrasse 56, Frankfurt am Main
on Thursday, December 15, 2016
image © we find wildness

one pic tuesday. Anna Weile Kjær & Esben Weile Kjær

ANNA WEILE KJÆR & ESBEN WEILE KJÆR, Radical Togetherness
installation view at Oslo 10, Basel, December 2016

image courtesy the artists and Oslo 10, Basel

Radical Togetherness was the title of the exhibition by ANNA WEILE KJÆR & ESBEN WEILE KJÆR that was presented for a couple of days at Oslo10 in Basel.

After having googled Radical Togetherness from my sofa, the free internet suggested that the term has been used a few times mainly to describe the fact of maintaining individuality within collective situations.

On the contrary, Radical Togetherness is meant in the exhibition in Basel ‘to identify the shared, merged and indistinguishable identities of siblings, close friends, partners or rock bands that go against the individuation process of neoliberalism’.

For Oslo10ANNA WEILE KJÆR & ESBEN WEILE KJÆR who are siblings, have conducted at DNA-test to determine how close genetically they are. The sealed letter containing the result of the test, some DNA memorabilia and a series of portrait of the siblings hung loosely on the walls, while some medieval beats were filling the space.

 

A video documentation of the exhibition is available on Oslo10 website as well as a wikipedia-page for the term Radical Togetherness that was also exhibited as content of the show.

Radical Togetherness by ANNA WEILE KJÆR & ESBEN WEILE KJÆR was on view at Oslo10 from 9 December to 13 December 2016.

wfw weekend #365

Untitled (2016), GREGORY SUGNAUX
seen at Wallriss, Fribourg
on Friday, December 9, 2016
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #364

Car2go (2016), KRIS LEMSALU
seen in the group exhibition Meaning Can Only Grow out of Intimacy (limbs, water, nostalgia)
at Espace Arlaud, Lausanne
on Friday, December 9, 2016
image © we find wildness

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ONE FAIR 6/6

Since you have been gone, a few things happened. The art fair I was invited to took place, Trump has been elected as president of the United States of America, a bigger and sunnier art fair I was not invited to happened, Trump is still the president elect, my grandma did not die, Gregory did, Christmas is starting again.

Still I was looking at your likes when your message popped up: it’s over babe!

I knew it. Well I should have known it. I have refreshed Susan Miller’s website three times that day and this month’s horoscopes was still  not up. It was probably just bad timing with the planets alignment, or maybe the future I told to myself has yet not started.

But you were right, it’s over. No more babe!, no more dolphins jumping out of my bedroom window, no more quotes from Nobel prize winners, no more whatsapp transcript, no more overhead snippets, no more justification in front of a court, no more grandma, no more missed birthday, no more lazy blogger nor blind one. This is officially the last text about the art fair.

Lets put it this way: it’s time for coffee. Or shall I envisage a true story now?

It means:

 

Trevor Paglen. Invisible Images (Your Pictures Are Looking at You)

screen capture of Invisible Images (Your Pictures Are Looking at You)
by TREVOR PAGLEN, for the New Inquiry, December 8, 2016

The New Inquiry has just published an essay by TREVOR PAGLEN whose work aims to represent the technologically or politically unseen. Entitled Invisible Images (Your Pictures Are Looking at You), the text examines the fact that according to the artist ‘the overwhelming majority of images are now made by machines for other machines, with humans rarely in the loop.’

The whole essay is available online via http://thenewinquiry.com/essays/invisible-images-your-pictures-are-looking-at-you/

one pic thursday. Dan Rees

Untitled, 2016
sand, clay, aggregate, lime, pigment, 116 x 110 x 12.5 cm

image courtesy the artist and Tanya Leighton, Berlin

Around 500 million years ago the Cambrian explosion gave birth to life on earth as we know it. The Cambrian period was followed by the Ordovician and then the Silurian. The time period takes its name from the Silures, an ancient Celtic tribe from Britain’s mountainous regions. These particular mountains were formed during the Caledonian Collision, which caused the closing of the Lapetus Ocean, bringing Avalonia and Laurentia together to form a large equatorial continent called Euramerica. Once as large as the Himalayas, the mountains are now in permanent retreat; water percolating through the cracks, shaping and softening their contours.

Beneath the Silures’ feet the Carboniferous swamps, mud, sediment and organic matter, compressed over millions of years, turned into high quality anthracite coal. This valuable dark artery runs serpentine from Spain under the Bay of Biscay to Britain and across the Atlantic to Pennsylvania. The subterranean horizontal passage of solidified carbon sludge is an ominous harbinger of the tumultuous binds that link the peoples and the social institutions born out of its exploitation.

On the golden sands of Langland Bay, 2,500 years ago… a Silurian child is building sand castles and knocking them down. – DAN REES (press release for the exhibition Ruins of the Cambrian Age)

Ruins of the Cambrian Age by DAN REES is on view at Tanya Leighton, Berlin until January 2016.

Domenico de Chirico for We Find Wildness #76

all images Courtesy of the artist and Neumeister Bar-Am, Berlin

Death Imitates Language., a solo exhibition by HARM VAN DEN DORPEL
at Neumeister Bar-Am in Berlin
until February 4, 2017

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO