wfw weekend #427

WHAM (2016), LUTZ BACHER
seen at Kunsthaus Glarus
on Friday, September 29, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #426

If I can’t sleep at night is it because I’m awake in someone else’s room? (re-stage) (2017), FETTE SANS 
seen at Hotel Zoo (Room 516), Berlin
on Thursday, September 14, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Agnes Martin, Writings / Schriften (English and German Edition), Kunstmuseum Winterthur and Edition Cantz, 1991

#laterpost 1982. Laurie Anderson

Les Nuits Magnetiques is a french radio show that had been created in 1978 by French writer ALAIN VEINSTEIN and that had been broadcasted until 1999. The show took different shapes during 21 years but with some recurrent elements like the length (90 minutes) , the voice of a narrator, a sound ambiance, a specific topic as well as some interviews from experts or anonymous people. Created in 1982 this documentary is dedicated to American artist LAURIE ANDERSON and has been featured again via France Culture in 2016.

https://www.franceculture.fr/theme/nuits-magnetiques

 

Karin Sander. Kunst

Stoffraum Art Basel, 1996
Fabric covering of the art fair walls, cut out, 434 clip frames in 6 different DIN formats and 4 square formats, each signed and numbered
photo © ANDREA ROSSETTI

Stoffraum Art Basel (detail)1996
Fabric covering of the art fair walls, cut out, 434 clip frames in 6 different DIN formats and 4 square formats, each signed and numbered
photo © ANDREA ROSSETTI

Stoffraum Art Basel (detail)1996
Fabric covering of the art fair walls, cut out, 434 clip frames in 6 different DIN formats and 4 square formats, each signed and numbered
photo © ANDREA ROSSETTI

Stoffraum Art Basel1996
Fabric covering of the art fair walls, cut out, 434 clip frames in 6 different DIN formats and 4 square formats, each signed and numbered
photo © ANDREA ROSSETTI
all images courtesy of the artist and Esther Schipper, Berlin

In 1996, KARIN SANDER realized the work Stoffraum Art Basel (Canvas Room Art Basel) for the newly introduced “Statements” section at the 27th Art Basel. In the approximately 6 x 6 m booth, sections in various DIN and square formats were cut from the canvas wall coverings then commonly used at the Basel art fair and placed in clip frames which were hung on top of the now blank sections of wall. 434 clip frames were placed on the wall’s surface, according to computer calculations, with approx. 5 cm distance between them. In this presentation, the canvas became both picture and consumer product. Signed and numbered on the back, these white tableaus were for sale and could be taken away immediately. Each sold work left an exposed section on the booth’s wall, revealing the wall’s raw wooden backing. While this process made visible the continual emptying of the booth as the art fair continued and works were sold, the end of the 1996 Art Basel marked the final condition of the work – the remaining framed works as well as the empty sections were fixed.

At the end of the fair, the booth walls were preserved in that state, documented and stored as a whole. Twenty-one years later, the “Statements” booth will now be exhibited in its original 1996 condition as a free-standing, walk-in sculpture.*

Stoffraum Art Basel (Canvas Room Art Basel) (1996) is on view at Esther Schipper in Berlin until October 21, 2017.

*pruned press release

 

wfw weekend #425

Oxhy – Beckoned towards nowhere(i couldnt hear singing from that hilltop) (2017), COUNTRY MUSIC

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wfw weekend #424

Elevate (2017), MATTHIAS SOHR
seen at Can, Neuchâtel
on Friday, September 15, 2017

image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #423

Push Comes To Love, untitled (1999-2017), STEPHEN PRINA
seen at Fahrbereitschaft, Berlin
on Thursday, September 14, 2017

image © we find wildness

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David Hanes. wfw aware #46

Aware: Untitled (2017)MANUEL BURGENER
presented at PROGR, Bern
shot on August 19, 2017, altered on August 30, 2017 by DAVID HANES*
image courtesy of the artist and we find wildness

*DAVID HANES lives and works in Berlin. He is represented by Birch Contemporary, Toronto.

➝ read more about this special project for we find wildness here.

Thomas Julier at Tithe Hall Ernen and Youth Club Ernen, July 9 – September 24, 2017 via contemporary art daily

The author must give up on aping genius. Rather show the author as ape, the author as idiot. Don’t have the hubris of being the comedian. You are the straight man in this farce; the universe is the funny man. So don’t be silly, cute, crack jokes, or play coy, but allow hilarity, a cleansing painful laughter that splits your sides and your heart. Follow your own foolishness like tracks upon the sand. – Lars Iyer, Nude in your hot tub, facing the abyss (a literary manifesto after the end of literature and manifestos), The White Review , November 2011

wfw weekend #422

Service No. 5: Dare to Keep Kids Off Naturalism, ADAM LINDER
seen at Kunsthalle Basel
on Saturday, September 9, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #421

exhibition view from Social SyntheticSETH PRICE
seen at Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam
on Tuesday, August 22, 2017
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THE COMPLETE WISEMAN: PART II (1986-1996), from Wednesday, September 6 to Thursday, September 14 at Film Forum New York

Thomas Nagel. What is it like to be a bat?

screen capture from http://organizations.utep.edu/portals/1475/nagel_bat.pdf
on September 5, 2017
image © we find wildness

What is it like to be a bat? is a text by American philosopher THOMAS NAGEL, first published in The Philosophical Review in October 1974.

In it, NAGEL explains how we can try to imagine what being a bat would be like (e.g., using sonar, sleeping upside down, eating bugs) but we can only get as far as imagining what it would be like for us to behave as a bat behaves and not how the bat truly experiences its experiences. NAGEL’s ‘subjective character of experience’ is the idea that if an organism has conscious mental states, then there is something that it is like to be that organism. Essentially, each organism has a unique subjective perspective and conscious experience that is only comprehensible from the organism’s point of view.

The entire text is available online via http://organizations.utep.edu/portals/1475/nagel_bat.pdf