Reena Spaulings. Her And No

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

Post Card (Cologne on Rhine) (I), 2010
detail, diptych, acrylic on canvas, 20 x 15 x 12 cm
Courtesy of the artist, and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

Post Card (Cologne on Rhine) (II), 2010
detail, diptych, acrylic on canvas, 20 x 15 x 12 cm
Courtesy of the artist, and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

 

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

Later Seascapes 9, 2015
acrylic on canvas, 250 x 450 x 5 cm
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Neu, Berlin

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

Advisors, Detail 1 (Eleanor Cayre), 2016
acrylic on Dibond, 86,4 x 66 cm
Courtesy of the artist, Private Collection and Campoli Presti, London/Paris

Advisors, Detail 12 (Suzanne Modica), 2016
acrylic on Dibond, 86,4 x 66 cm
Courtesy of the artist, Private Collection and Campoli Presti, London/Paris

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

Bonjour!, 2017
courtesy of the artist

REENA SPAULINGS is a fictional entity created in 2004 without a face and for unique point of reference a fiction written by BERNADETTE CORPORATION . The now ageless artist based in New York, whose identity has been dissolved by several activities including an art gallery (Reena Spaulings Fine Art) and perpetual collaborations, is showing her work into a solo exhibition in Cologne.

Entitled Her And No, the presentation at Museum Ludwig includes, according to the press release, ‘new works, new ver­sions of ex­ist­ing se­ries of works, and ex­ist­ing works’ that undermine, as with much of SPAULINGS‘ works, traditional notions of authorship and artistic styles.

Her And No by REENA SPAULINGS is on view at Museum Ludwig in Cologne until August 27, 2017.

It’s interesting, for instance, how charcoal becomes trendy today in organic and well-being food, even if it’s been fucking up generations of miner’s lungs. Some use it as a natural way to ease stomach pain and bad digestion. I prefer its vomiting effects: it’s used as an emergency treatment for certain kinds of severe poisoning and OD’s. I like that it’s presented here in the shape of a large, family-size bread we could eat of all together, while expelling all the possible mad-driving toxins. The idea of letting go, of fluidity, of opening the valves, a joyful communal diarrhea prompted me to ask the baker how we could form a sort of orifice in the bread. He folded his arm and pushed his elbow far in the middle of the fresh dough. – The Future of Not Working, Aline Bouvy in conversation with Louise Osieka, June 5, 2017

one pic monday. Richard Prince

Newspaper Photography. NYT’S. Today (8 July 2017), RICHARD PRINCE

image courtesy RICHARD PRINCE

The image of today is a picture posted by RICHARD PRINCE on July 8, 2017 on his twitter. It is a reshot by PRINCE from a photography by DAVID YOUNG/DPA that has been published by the New York Times on July 8, 2017.

Rephotography is a technique for stealing (pirating) already existing images,  simulating rather than copying them, “managing” rather than quoting them, re-producing their effect and look as naturally as they had been produced when they first appeared. A resemblance more than a reproduction, a rephotograph is essentially an appropriation of what’s already real about an existing image and an attempt to add on or additionalize this reality onto something more real, a virtuoso real, a reality that has the chances of looking real, but a reality that doesn’t have any chances of being real. The technique is a physical activity which locates an individual behind a camera, a place from which the individual can view nothing but the collected image, a place that affords the opportunity to view exactly how the audience will eventually see the image as an object and a location from which it is possible for an individual to identify him or herself as much as an audience as an author.excerpt from RICHARD PRINCE, Practising Without A Licence, 1977

Is the act of rephotographing already existing images still a relevant theft?

 

wfw weekend #416

detail from La grand invasion des peuples et des meubles (2017), LUTZ & GUGGISBERG
seen at Bellelay Abbey,
on Sunday, July 2, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #415

Yard – from zero to sixty mph (1961 – 2017), ALLAN KAPROW & SAN KELLER
seen at Kunsthaus, Zürich
on Saturday, July 8, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Robert Grosvenor at Maccarone, Los Angeles

ROBERT GROSVENOR
exhibtion view at Maccarone, Los Angeles, July – September 2017

Untitled, 1997
stone, concrete, steel, glass
54 x 369.5 x 100 inches (137.2 x 938.5 x 254 cm)
Courtesy of Robert Grosvenor, Maccarone New York/Los Angeles and  Paul Cooper Gallery, New York

Untitled, 1991
steel, concrete block, fiberglass and plastic
87 x 42.5 x 86 inches (221 x 108 x 218.4 cm)
Courtesy of Robert Grosvenor, Maccarone New York/Los Angeles and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Untitled, 2016
plywood, aluminum, steel, fiberglass and plexiglass
84 x 360 x 240 inches (213.4 x 914.4 x 609.6 cm) (7′ x 30′ x 20′)
Courtesy of Robert Grosvenor, Maccarone New York/Los Angeles and  Paul Cooper Gallery, New York

Untitled (detail),  2016
plywood, aluminum, steel, fiberglass and plexiglass
84 x 360 x 240 inches (213.4 x 914.4 x 609.6 cm) (7′ x 30′ x 20′)
Courtesy of Robert Grosvenor, Maccarone New York/Los Angeles and  Paul Cooper Gallery, New York

ROBERT GROSVENOR‘s work can exist in a museum. Or on a driveway. Or in a barn. Or whatever. In other words, GROSVENOR‘s sculptures seem to still function as real things in the world, and not as some extraneous objects to be placed on a pedestal. Similarly, many of the materials he is using are familiar, industrial and found. GROSVENOR‘s arrangements display singular yet familiar structures and forms while emphasizing the use-value of materials as well as the traces of time on their surfaces.

Maccarone in Los Angeles is currently presenting an exhibition by ROBERT GROSVENOR. This solo exhibition is on view until September 30, 2017.

one pic wednesday. Jiří Kovanda

 

The power of capital rests on that fiction of a present engendered by art; it is not least thanks to art that capital has become autonomous vis-à-vis politics and production. And the manifest product of this autonomy is the total aestheticization of life, politics, and (philosophical) thinking. It is in response to this aestheticization that we urgently need to consider (poetic) alternatives. – The Speculative End Of The Aesthetic Regime, Armen Avanessian, Texte Zur Kunst, Issue No. 93 / March 2014 „speculation“

wfw weekend #414

view from the group exhibition Artist’s shoes
seen at Smallville, Neuchâtel
on Friday, June 30, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #413

Living Currencies (2017), BIRGIT MEGERLE
seen at Kunsthaus Glarus
on Wednesday, June 29, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Yung Chong BaDboI for We Find Wildness #1

image courtesy Yung Chong and We Find Wildness

Yung Chong BaDboI is a series of comic strip that portrays the human condition through deceptively simple lines and yellow birds. Every now and then Yung Chong’s birds will be featured on wfw, and will delve as usual into the realms of social anxiety, depression, relationships, and sleeplessness.

To explore the complete Yung Chong comics collection, head on over to his instagram or tumblr.

 

 

Isaac Contreras. The Creeps

The Creeps, installation view at HEAD, Geneva, 2017

The Creeps, installation view at HEAD, Geneva, 2017

The Creeps (detail), 2017
hand molded plastic, glue and artist’s hair, 17 x 6,5 x 7,5 cm

The Creeps, installation view at HEAD, Geneva, 2017

The Creeps, 2017
hand molded plastic, glue and artist’s hair
left:  6,5 x 6,5 x 7,5 cm, right: 18 x 10,5 x 11 cm

Settings, 2017
ink on photographic print, 20 x 11,3 cm

The Creeps (detail), 2017
hand molded plastic, glue and artist’s hair, 14,5 x 11,5 x 10,5 cm

The Creeps, 2017
hand molded plastic, glue and artist’s hair
left:  9 x 10,5 x 11 cm, right: 7,5 x 6 x 7,5 cm

Unbecoming you, 2017
ink on photographic print, 42,5 x 30 cm

all images courtesy ISAAC CONTRERAS
photos: IC Studio

When arriving in Switzerland in 2014, ISAAC CONTRERAS decided to let grow his hair. Three years later, in February 2017 during the snow moon, he cut it all off marking an end to a long-term performative process.

The process was punctuated by unannounced actions when I opened my hair, most notably in social gatherings or art openings. I was trying to produce this act as an event and frequently I played excessively with my hair whenever was a camera to try to “catch” a picture. To look for images, I sent an email to people I met during this time. Friends and co-workers that somehow were there while this thing was happening. Since this long term action was naturally happening in a myriad of places, the images are really diverse and far from a normative neutral white background. – as told by ISAAC CONTRERAS for we find wildness

His hair, collected in February, have been turned into a series of miniature sculptures that has been presented at his graduation exhibition at the University of Art and Design of Geneva. The sculptures which look like tiny hairdo helmets, were complemented by portraits of the artist with various hairstyles.

This body of work entitled The Creeps challenges the notion of ‘being’.  ISAAC CONTRERAS captured a moment in time and then removed himself from that moment. That is to say that after he cut off his hair, CONTRERAS was no longer a part of the moment but a member of the audience. A public that is now beseting with the question: What does it mean to ‘be present’ or to ‘be there’?

 

 

 

Cady Noland

screen capture from http://www.jca-online.com/noland.html
on June 22, 2017
image © we find wildness

Imagine, then, each of CADY NOLAND ’s installations as an entry into an ever-collecting, mortally transient, tactile encyclopedia of visceral Americana, where each entry is constructed of principled materials (for instance, aluminum), storied objects (handcuffs, rubber tires, Budweiser beer cans, bug sprayers, American flags, wire mesh baskets and fences), and embodied ephemera (Patty Hearst, Charles Manson, Wilbur Mills, Vince Foster): Art as encyclopedia, history as vaudeville.–  THYRZA NICHOLS GOODEVE,  Parkett No. 46, 1996

Please note that CADY NOLAND’s work is currently part of a presentation at Mamco in Geneva along with sculptures and installations by LAURIE PARSONS and FELIX-GONZALEZ-TORRES. Their works are on view until September 10, 2017.

Meanwhile you can read the whole interview between MICHELE CONE and CADY NOLAND for the Journal of Contemporary Art via http://www.jca-online.com/noland.html

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one message interview #40. Luc Mattenberger

 

On the topic of non-performance induced by the answer of LUC MATTENBERGER, here is an excerpt from the fantasy novel Monday Begins on Saturday written by ARKADY and BORIS STRUGATSKY in 1964.

In the premises of the Department of Absolute Knowledge all the small upper windows were open, because the smell of Professor Vybegallo’s herring heads was seeping in. There was snow heaped up on the windowsills and there were dark puddles under the radiators of the steam central heating system. I closed the windows and walked between the virginally clean desks of the department’s staff members. Standing on the desks were brand-new ink sets that had never seen ink, but there were cigarette butts spilling out of the inkwells. This was a strange department. Its motto was: ‘The cognition of infinity requires an infinite amount of time.’ I could hardly dispute that assertion, but the staff drew an unexpected conclusion from it: ‘And therefore it makes no difference whether you work or not.

http://www.lucmattenberger.com/

read the previous one message interviews here

Arthur Jafa, APEX_TNEG, at The MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology (ACT), on February 25, 2013 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUBm2_v5RUw