wfw weekend #400

page from Wages For Wages Against, RAMAYA TEGEGNE
produced in conjuction with the exhibition Speak, Lokal at Kunsthalle Zürich (March-May 2017)
image © we find wildness

One form of resistance is to go dark, to stop making artwork that can in any way be represented on the platforms that facilitate these forms of recuperation. But even if you as an artist don’t post images of your work on social media, other people might. You could institute a Berghain rule and administer stickers over phone’s camera lenses upon entering an exhibition, but then, hashtags are indexable forms of language that don’t require images and are still a useful metric for brands. You could literally never show your work to anyone. You could embrace chaos and illegibility, creating visual or written work that is non-instrumentalizable, but legible across many parts over a longer period of time. This might mean making work that operates at a different tempo than that of branding and social media, work that occupies multiple sites and forms, work that fights for the complexity of identity (as artist or otherwise) and form, and believes in a creaturely capacity for patience with a maximum dedication to understanding. – Dena Yago, on Ketamine and Added Value, e-flux, May 2017

Domenico de Chirico for We Find Wildness #85

all images: © ANDREAS SLOMINSKI
Courtesy the artist and Galerie Neu, Berlin

transhumanistisch, a solo exhibition by ANDREAS SLOMINSKI
on view at Galerie Neu, Berlin
until June 2, 2017

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

Remco Torenbosch. Integration

Porter (2017)
installation view at Saloon, Brussels, April-Mai 2017

Porter (2017)
installation view at Saloon, Brussels, April-Mai 2017

Porter (2017)
installation view at Saloon, Brussels, April-Mai 2017

Integration, installation view at Saloon, Brussel, April-May 2017

Integration, installation view at Saloon, Brussel, April-May 2017

Miner (2014-2017)
installation view at Saloon, Brussels, April-Mai 2017

Integration, installation view at Saloon, Brussel, April-May 2017

Integration, installation view at Saloon, Brussel, April-May 2017

all images: courtesy the artist and Saloon, Brussels
photography: LOLA PERTSOWSKY

REMCO TORENBOSCH‘s practice is essentially research-based and explores concrete economic, politic and cultural situations that he is using in a way to ideologically question their context.

In his Saloon exhibition, IntegrationTORENBOSCH deals with two companies rooted in the former Dutch colonies: tin mining company Billiton Maatschappij and natural rubber production company Rubber Cultuur Maatschappij Amsterdam. These two multinationals were established during the last period of the colonial Indonesian occupation by the Dutch, which formed the Dutch East Indies (1816—1949) .

TORENBOSCH was interested by these two industries for their significant role played in the dematerialization of the contemporary digitalized economy.

After analysing the production and distributional data of both companies in the national archives, and visiting several tin mines and rubber plantations on Sumatra and Java in 2015, TORENBOSCH presents a series of ready-made objects as sculptures including Porter (2017) and Miner (2014-2017):

Miner (2014—2017) focuses on the Miner, a crypto mining computer that virtually collects crypto currency, yet requires physical mining of ‘conflict minerals’ to produce its hardware. Torenbosch’s interest in crypto currency was triggered by the heavy contradiction and overlap found in the jargon that surrounds it such as ‘mining’, ‘mining pools’, and ‘workers’. This terminology of physical labour used in fully automated labour counteracts the agonizing physical mining that is needed to produce the printed circuit boards of the actual miner. In the early 1970s, 20 years after the Indonesian National Revolution that officially acknowledged Indonesia’s independence, oil and gas company Royal Dutch Shell acquired the former colonial company Billiton Maatschappij. This acquisition accelerated the mining growth, turning Indonesia into one of the world’s largest producers of tin. From that point on tin became a commodity mainly used for hardware for electronic devices like computers. During his research for this exhibition Torenbosch came across the miners that are on display in Integration. These miners are manufactured in Jakarta, Indonesia, the former capital of the Dutch East Indies and the former epicentre of trading networks in Asia. The circuit boards of these miners contain tin that was physically mined at the Bangka-Belitung islands in South Sumatra Indonesia. Here, the Billiton Maatschappij started its mining, hence the islands became the namesake of the company. In 2001, a fusion of Billiton Maatschappij and the Australian BHP formed BHP Billiton, which later became the largest mining company in the world.

Porter (2017) is a collection of rubber objects used for offshore and deep sea mining. The works are connected to the Dutch East Indies Rubber Cultuur Maatschappij Amsterdam, a leading exporter of natural rubber during the late colonial period. In 1856 it started to produce and collect its high quality natural rubber at several plantations on Sumatra and Java. The company played an influential role as one of the most prominent suppliers of insulation rubber used for the wiring of the British All Red Line that started in 1858. The line was a transatlantic telegraph cable to connect the colonies to the west and ran through the Dutch territory of Java. It is historically seen as the forerunner of the submarine fiber optic cables which are a main instrument of international virtual trade in which transactions are made digital. Originally, the objects in the exhibition functioned as insulation material of water and sound during the process of automated offshore and deep sea mining. They are made of synthetic rubber that since the industrial revolution overruled the industry of natural rubber due to its low production costs. In these objects, traces of usage of offshore mining and natural marks by salt water are noticeable but abstract. Like the miner computers, these objects distribute the shifting notion between physical labour and automation that centralize the paradox of how a dematerialized and digital world emerged from a materialized one with physical labour at its core.*

Integration by REMCO TORENBOSCH is on view at Saloon, Brussels until May 7, 2017.

*press release from Saloon, Brussels

Christopher Williams on Post Studio and Michael Asher for ‘The Experimental Impulse’, September 28, 2011

wfw weekend #399

The BCBG (2017), EMILIE PITOISET
seen at Klemm’s, Berlin
on Saturday, April 22, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #398

In the Shadow We Put Together a House (2017), EDIT ODERBOLZ
seen at Crac Alsace, Altkirch
on Thursday, April 20, 2017
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #397

Outside the Dream Syndicate (1973), TONY CONRAD and FAUST
see also TONY CONRAD: Completely in the Present (2016), TYLER HUBBY
watched on Saturday, April 22, 2017

 

“John Baldessari: Paintings 1966–68” is on view at Craig F. Starr Gallery in New York through Saturday, May 20, 2017. The solo exhibition brings together many of the artist’s earliest text and photo-text paintings for the first time since they were first shown at Molly Barnes Gallery in 1968.

one pic wednesday. Philipp Timischl

Class Drag, 2017
installation view at Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna, 2017
Courtesy Emanuel Layr, Vienna

To say that this is a work of extraordinary surfaces is not the same as saying it’s a superficial body of work. But there are some pieces by TIMISCHL that appear as though they are essentially dull screens, put up so the content can run in the background, almost out of sight. It makes no difference how empty or familiar the surface. It’s like seeing the superficial flatness of the image while simultaneously confirming its authority.

Hostile Habits Domestic Monuments, Class Drag / Vienna by PHILIPP TIMISCHL is on view at Galerie Emanuel Layr until May 27, 2017.

Maria Loboda. Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom

installation view Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom, Kunsthalle Basel, 2017
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

installation view Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom, Kunsthalle Basel, 2017
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

installation view Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom, Kunsthalle Basel, 2017
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

installation view Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom, Kunsthalle Basel, 2017,
view on Raw Material Coming from Heaven, 2017
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

installationsansicht Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom, Kunsthalle Basel, 2017
view on Mrs. Van Hopper, 2017
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

installationsansicht Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom, Kunsthalle Basel, 2017
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

installation view Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom, Kunsthalle Basel, 2017
view on Note the Incendiary Weapon on the Left Ledge of the Third Gate, 2017
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

Installationsansicht Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom, Kunsthalle Basel, 2017
view on Note the Incendiary Weapon on the Left Ledge of the Third Gate, 2017
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

Installationsansicht Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom, Kunsthalle Basel, 2017
view on Two Idiots Engaged in a Game of Chess, 2017
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

all works courtesy of Maria Loboda and MAISTERRAVALBUENA, Madrid

Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom is the title of the solo exhibition by MARIA LOBODA currently presented at Kunsthalle Basel.

The title comes from a chapter of an epic chinese myth from the sixteenth century, which tells the story of Sun Wukong, a monkey born from a stone and who acquires supernatural powers through Taoist practices in the novel Journey to the West:

Sun Wukong possesses an immense amount of strength, being able to lift his 13,500 jīn (8,100 kg) Ruyi Jingu Bang (Golden Cudge, 如意金箍棒) with ease. He also has superb speed, traveling 108,000 li (54,000 kilometers) in one somersault. Sun knows 72 transformations, which allows him to transform into various animals and objects; he is, however, shown with slight problems transforming into other people, since he is unable to complete the transformation of his tail. He is a skilled fighter, capable of holding his own against the best generals of heaven. Each of his hairs possesses magical properties, and is capable of transforming into a clone of the Monkey King himself, or various weapons, animals, and other objects. He also knows various spells in order to command wind, part water, conjure protective circles against demons, and freeze humans, demons, and gods alike.

Hoping that a promotion and a rank amongst the gods would make him more manageable, the Jade Emperor invited Sun Wukong to Heaven, where the monkey believed he would receive an honorable place as one of the gods. Instead, he was made the Protector of the Horses to watch over the stables, which was the lowest job in heaven. When he discovered this, Sun Wukong rebelled and proclaimed himself the “Great Sage, Equal of Heaven”, and allied with some of the most powerful demons on earth. The Heavens’ initial attempt at subduing the Monkey King was unsuccessful, and they were forced to recognize his title; however, they tried again to put him off as the guardian of Heavenly Garden. When he found that he was excluded from a royal banquet that included every other important god and goddess, Sun Wukong’s indignation again turned to open defiance. After stealing Xi Wangmu’s “peaches of immortality”, Lao Tzu’s “pills of longevity”, and the Jade Emperor’s royal wine, he escaped back to his kingdom in preparation for his rebellion.

Sun Wukong later defeated the Army of Heaven’s 100,000 celestial warriors – each fight an equivalent of a cosmic embodiment, including all 28 constellations, four heavenly kings, and Nezha – and proved himself equal to the best of Heaven’s generals, Erlang Shen. Eventually, through the teamwork of Taoist and Buddhist forces, including the efforts from some of the greatest deities, Sun Wukong was captured. After several failed attempts at execution, Sun Wukong was locked into Lao Tzu’s eight-way trigram cauldron to be distilled into an elixir by the most sacred and the most severe samadhi fires.

After 49 days, the cauldron was opened and Sun Wukong jumped out, stronger than ever. He now had the ability to recognize evil in any form through his huǒyǎn-jīnjīng (火眼金睛) (lit. “fiery-eyes golden-gaze”), an eye condition that also gave him a weakness to smoke.*

By speaking about battles that were fought, lost, and won, and empires that collapsed a long time ago‘*, MARIA LOBODA aims to question the references, fractures, continuities and interpretation of stories and history.

Havoc in the Heavenly Kingdom by MARIA LOBODA is on view until May 14, 2017 at Kunsthalle Basel.

*via http://arts.cultural-china.com/en/87Arts7184.html

* MARIA LOBODA via http://www.kunsthallebasel.ch/wp-content/uploads/KH-Basel-Exhibitiontext-Loboda-EN-WEB.pdf

.

wfw weekend #396

Outside Portal (2008), KILIAN RÜTHEMANN
seen at Kunstmuseum Basel
on Thursday, April 13, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Laure Prouvost

screen capture from http://conversations.e-flux.com/t/cant-help-it-laure-prouvost-in-conversation-with-didem-pekun/6451
on April 14, 2017
image © we find wildness

 

This is a short excerpt of a conversation between LAURE PROUVOST and DIDEM PEKÜN that  happened at Kılıç Ali Paşa Hammam, a Turkish bath in Istanbul.

Between flows of hot air, PROUVOST discussed her upcoming exhibition in Istanbul, her grandmother’s tunnel, octopuses and liquid fictions. The whole conversation is available via http://conversations.e-flux.com/t/cant-help-it-laure-prouvost-in-conversation-with-didem-pekun/6451.

Please not that her work will be part of the exhibition The Uses of Art: Final Exhibition from April 20 to June 11, 2017 at SALT in Istanbul as well as in the group exhibition Speak at Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London until May 21, 2017.

 

 

 

Seth Price. 8-4 9-5 10-6 11-7

8-4 9-5 10-6 11-7, 2007
© SETH PRICE

On the occasion of the first survey of SETH PRICE that is going to open at Stedelijk at the end of the week, I looked in my archive for some online and offline works that I have encountered during these past few years.

8-4 9-5 10-6 11-7 (2007) holds my attention. The piece consists of a ‘work’ mix. It means basically that it is an eight hour track which can be played during an 8-hour work day. Or not.

In a 2009 interview with BOŠKO BLAGOJEVIĆ, PRICE said about this work: I was thinking about work days, where different sets of working hours represent different kinds of work and different cultural areas: a union job, an office job, an art gallery, a boutique… But it’s true, I liked the fact that the track could be played perfectly, start to finish, during an 8-hour work day.

The track is free to stream or to download here.

Social Synthetic by SETH PRICE is on view at Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam until September 3, 2017. Meanwhile I recommend to browse his soundcloud profile which is filled with past sounds, playlists and tracks.

The history of the joke and the tradition of jokes have always been wrapped up with questions of power. But at this moment when people — especially on the left, which includes many people in arts communities — are feeling embattled and less powerful, or with less hope, let’s say, which is another form of power in a sense, the idea of the joke becomes more useful. – VANESSA PLACE, excerpt from 500 words, Artforum, April 2017