Violet Dennison. Transcend

Transcend, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Transcend, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Transcend (detail), 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Ones, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Ones, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Soft Target, 2016
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Pipe Re-Route, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Pipe Re-Route, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Pipe Re-Route, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Pipe Re-Route, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Pipe Re-Route, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

all images courtesy of the artist and Jan Kaps, Cologne

VIOLET DENNISON is currently presenting Transcend, a solo exhibition at the art venue Jan Kaps in Cologne, Germany. The press release published below has been written by science fiction writer MARK VON SCHLEGELL. The text describes the inanimate elements in the exhibition from the bacteria’s point of view. The latter are left to themselves, without cultures and independent in the exhibition space thanks to a pipe which discharged the wastewater from the washbasin in the exhibition space.

Escape for the artist is no longer according to posthuman human fantasy. In January 2017, WALT WHITMAN’s “little wash’d up drift” has found itself real, that is to say grown up, longhaired, flagrant, and principled female: the duringhuman. Consider today’s seagrass, whose duringhumanism was defined by sewage and whose death placed it on currents that floated it to Massachusetts. In death, duringhumanism awards it its own illusions, now offering this very POV pinned as if on a raft to the wall of a gallery in Cologne, Germany, somewhere up a lazy river.

For the duration of the exhibition (perhaps to this exquisite corpse relative to the length of a single human day) it dreams itself art. The ever drier weeks relieved only by the spectacle, from moment to moment, of water spilling out on the floor. In its very existence as “dead,” we perceive the seagrass shed more and more body. Death in a continual process. Will the grass one day float again when the river awakes and the valley floods? Will it green? Enjoying a life potentially greater than our own, containing within it a POV equally as ironic, this creature remains recognizably wild, or extra-human (as we expect more complete, more delicate and discover refined and particular) and alive exactly as it’s dead.

By most accounts, plumbing began human civilization. Can we wash our hands of the drains? We impalpable breezes, breaths, bacteria, still find ourselves duringhuman. We have these humans on our back, inextinct and limited. Sadly the sort of apocalypse we now entertain is not a simple freakout one-time poisoning as envisioned in the cold war. Now, as the engine piece perhaps of extinction, of the larger puzzle of all life as one brief expansion of the infinite into the infinite, we must occupy deterioration in such a fashion as to slow down our demise. Will we even get off planet? Before we can escape, we must first find ourselves. It bears remembering that homo sapiens existed in presumable tranquility for some one hundred seventy-seven thousand years before the mere seven thousand of the duringhuman began.

I myself arrived on a beach in Massachusetts from far away. A veteran of nearby New Bedford, a breather of the secret Salem that touches the sea, it was an easy transition on this impalpable breeze, and also up a foreign stream. I take and return the breath as it’s formulated in Klossowski’s The Baphomet (1965) as something that divides, but only infinitely and without principle. The sort of divide into dualities of Hegelianism and beyond is thought by me to be nuts. I dwell below, within, above the hum of human fantasy, at the high bacteriological. Updown here there may be a point to existence even now then. This expansive evershrinking expresses the generosity of decay belonging properly to Earth, my planet.

Hive all around me now, duringhumans. Rub and rub. You’ll never wash your hands of the pubic chaff, straw, splinters of wood, weeds, and the sea-gluten, scum, cum, scales from shining rocks. Species hierarchy is now clear. We bacteria alone can ride water from the husk. We must instantaneously befuddle the opportunistic humanisms still relying upon walls. – MARK VON SCHLEGELL, 2017.

Transcend by VIOLET DENNISON is on view at Jan Kaps, Cologne until April 8, 2017.

 

wfw weekend #385

Walk Through Walls (Change Your Fingerprints) (2017), OSCAR TUAZON
seen at Eva Presenhuber, Zürich
on Thursday, March 2, 2017
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #384

Silkscreen (The New Yorker) (2003), The Things We Are Doing No. 1 (Reiher Sonne) (2003), MICHAEL KREBBER
seen at Kunsthalle Bern
on Wednesday, February 22, 2017
image © we find wildness

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one message interview #39. Pauline Beaudemont

image © we find wildness

click on the phone to read the whole message

12’960’000 seconds, 216’000 minutes, 3600 hours, 150 days, 21 weeks, 4 months. This is the approximative time that went between the answer of PAULINE BEAUDEMONT and its publication. In the meantime everything and nothing has changed.

http://www.paulinebeaudemont.com

read the previous one message interviews here

Domenico de Chirico for We Find Wildness #82

all images:
installation view, kurimanzutto Mexico City
© Gabriel Orozco – Photo: ESTUDIO MICHEL ZABE
Courtesy of the artist and kurimanzutto, Mexico City

OXXO, an intervention by GABRIEL OROZCO
on view within the San Miguel Chapultepec neighborhood, México City
until March 16, 2017

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

Repetition in choreography is a useful procedure that brings out the materiality of what might often be considered as immaterial. By experiencing something again and again and again you go through waves of proximity, observation of detail, boredom and desire. When a structure becomes very apparent, you begin to see the way the performer is navigating and engaging with that structure. The split between the performer and what they are doing, between the dancer and the dance becomes more apparent. The opposite is also true, there is an impossibility because these two elements can never be split. – ALEX BACZYNSKI-JENKINS in conversation with ELLEN GREIG, Chisenhale Gallery London, January 2017

one pic wednesday. Robert Grosvenor

Untitled, 1989-90
installation view at The Renaissance Society, Chicago
Courtesy of the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

I spend a fair amount of time torturing myself with watching over exhibitions in places where I am not, like this one by ROBERT GROSVENOR (1937).

27 years after its initial realization, The Renaissance Society in Chicago is presenting Untitled (1989-90), a monumental sculpture by ROBERT GROSVENOR. The work is made of materials he collected such as for this specific piece, concrete blocks, steel, plexiglass, and paint.

More generally his works and his exhibitions don’t resolve into one view at all, nor they are coated with informations. His objects instead are keeping the visitor moving around them in order to unfold patiently in real space and in time. This piece is no exception.

Untitled (1989-90) is on view at The Renaissance Society in Chicago until April 9, 2017.

David Hanes. wfw aware #42

Aware: The Lodge of Breathless Birds (2016)MARK DION
presented at Kunstmuseum St.Gallen
shot on January 14, 2017, altered on February 15, 2017 by DAVID HANES*
image courtesy of the artist and we find wildness

*DAVID HANES lives and works in Berlin. He is represented by Birch Contemporary, Toronto.

➝ read more about this special project for we find wildness here.

wfw weekend #383

Fugues (2017)ALEX-BACZYNSKI-JENKINS
seen at Chisenhale Gallery, London
on Friday, February 17, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #382

Poor Me (2016), NEAL JONES
seen at Southard Reid, London
on Friday, February 17, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Domenico de Chirico for We Find Wildness #81

all images courtesy the artist and Laura Bartlett Gallery, London

&, a solo exhibition by SIMON DYBBROE MØLLER
on view at Laura Bartlett Gallery in London
until March 5, 2017

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

Puppies Puppies is inevitably the work of a person born during the rise of the Internet. The rhythm of their life has been established by machines. In some ways, this contradicts the personal and the emotional. But the Internet, especially in the beginning, was also deeply involved with intimacy and emotional connection between strangers. Sex with strangers reveals something very deep about human existence, and maybe coming to know some artists and their activity is like having sex with strangers. – Forrest (husband of Puppies Puppies) in conversation with Tenzing Barshee, Mousse 57 (February–March 2017)

one pic wednesday. Kader Attia

Reason’s Oxymorons, 2015
18 films and installation of cubicles
duration: variable, 13 to 25 minutes
55 x 262 x 468 inches (installed overall), 139.7 x 665.5 x 1188.7 cm
Edition of 3

installation view at Lehmann Maupin, New York, January 2017
image courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York

Reason’s Oxymorons (2015) is a large scale installation by KADER ATTIA that has been shown for the first time in 2015 at the Lyon Biennial. It is currently on view in New York at the Lehmann Maupin gallery.

Like for its previous presentations, the video installation Reason’s Oxymorons (2015) is shown into cubicle workstations. Each individual cubicles is featuring one video interview with a philosopher, ethnologist, historian, psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, musicologist, patient, healer, fetishist, and griot conducted in several countries. They talk about themes like “Genocide”, “Totem and Fetish”, “Reason and Politics” and “Trance”. The whole is a ‘mix of rational explanations and irrational representations of what the West calls psychiatry. ‘The work is particularly concerned with the question of the unrepairable and it calls into question the ambivalence of the psyche of modern Western societies towards traditional Non-Western societies’*.

What’s important to understand, when talking about capitalism as a constant illusion of fixing, is that the real issue of war is the polarization between repair and destruction. This helped me understand how much war and creation – war and art – work together in a very narrow, complementary and interdependent process, echoing the endless processes of life in the universe, which at some point are embodied and personified, and represent the notion of repair. Because there is no repair if there is no injury somewhere. Conceptually you cannot conceive of the notion of repair without an injury. Repair is fed by injury, and vice-versa.KADER ATTIA in conversation with IRIT ROGOFF, 2016

Reason’s Oxymorons by KADER ATTIA is on view at Lehmann Maupin in New York until March 4, 2017.

* Lyon Biennale, 2015

http://gossipsweb.net: a database of alternative art spaces

Kevin Barrett Weil. Two Addresses

Rattle in the Form of a Fugitive Assembly, 2017
furniture, hardware, Magic Wand Massager, polyurethane foam

Rattle in the Form of a Fugitive Assembly, 2017
furniture, hardware, Magic Wand Massager, polyurethane foam

Rattle in the Form of a Fugitive Assembly, 2017
furniture, hardware, Magic Wand Massager, polyurethane foam

Rattle in the Form of a Fugitive Assembly, 2017
furniture, hardware, Magic Wand Massager, polyurethane foam

Rattle in the Form of a Fugitive Assembly, 2017
furniture, hardware, Magic Wand Massager, polyurethane foam

Rattle in the Form of a Fugitive Assembly, 2017
furniture, hardware, Magic Wand Massager, polyurethane foam

Rattle in the Form of a Climacteric Event, 2017
store-bought apples

Untitled, 2017
multiple infrared motion activated light sockets

all images courtesy of the artist and Beautiful Gallery, Chicago

The climacteric event to which title of the box of apples refers, is the peak point of apple ripeness. This is the point when the apple is both most ripe and edible, and also the beginning of the apples decaying process. In humans, the climacteric event is known as menopause. – KEVIN BARRETT WEIL for his solo exhibition entitled Two Addresses and presented at Beautiful Gallery in Chicago.

Make sure to view the exhibition in person before it closes on February 25, 2017.