Towards a Metalanguage of Evil, Cady Noland, Balcon No. 4, 1989

Why Does Fred Sandback’s Work Make Me Cry?, Andrea Fraser, Grey Room NO. 22 / Winter 2006 p.30-47

Cindy Sherman. Nobody’s Here But Me

Curating in the Post-Internet Age, Boris Groys, e-flux #94 – October 2018

It is important to note that Natascha Süder Happelmann is not a pseudonym – such as Lutz Bacher, for example – but an adaption. While pseudonyms are used to avoid revealing one’s real identity, Süder Happelmann wants her name to be traced back to her real one. For this purpose, the artist evaluated collected misspellings and autocorrects of her name with which she had been addressed over the past 30 years and selected Natascha Süder Happelman to be ‘the proper name for this important task’ as her spokeswoman Duldung explained. In order to represent Germany at one of the most important exhibitions in the world, the artist considered it necessary to ‘integrate’ by using a more German-sounding with umlauts and ‘-mann’ suffix to her surname. – ‘Natascha Süder Happelmann’ will represent Germany at the 2019 Venice Biennale, Carina Bukuts, Frieze Magazine, October 26, 2018

Saw myself in film. Odd, seeing one’s self as a puppet. Heightening of mirror effect. Narcissus stirs, walks, sees himself from the back, as he cannot see and could not imagine himself. Becomes aware of a whole area indissociable from him, a host of hidden bonds, a whole Other sustaining the Same. Receives the invisible self. One is cast out of one’s self, change into another. One passes judgement upon one’s self – If it could see or perceive, through this artifice, the mind thus externalized, and from forbidden angles – what awareness would one have? What effect on one’s sense of self? To see one’s self thinking, responding, sleeping. – Paul Valéry, Ego, 1973 from On the Eve of the Future, Selected Writings on Film, Annette Michelson

The Jean Freeman Gallery Does Not Exist, Christopher Howard, MIT Press, October 2018

Kenneth Anger, Babylon, 1959

Vanessa Place & Cassandra Seltman. Gagging on rape

Naomi Velissariou & Joost Maaskant & Frederik Heyman. Digital Funeral

The Outside Can’t Go Outside, Merlin Carpenter, HEAD Geneva lecture, April 2015

Self Destruction by Retribution Body, performed and engineered by Matthew Azevedo, recorded at Torrent Engine 18, Boston MA, January 2017

Bernard-Marie Koltès, Roberto Zucco (1989)

one pic thursday. Jenny Holzer

Birmingham Museums Trust has decided to go for “open access”, the first major British museum to do so. In a pioneering move, the trust will make images of copyright-expired works of art freely available to use under a CCO Creative Commons licence. This is the most open form of licence, and essentially means that the images are now in the public domain. The trust has over 800,000 objects, spread across nine sites (…). There is a catch, but I think it’s potentially quite a clever one. The free images will be limited to 3MB in size, at a resolution of 300 dpi. Birmingham will still charge for its highest resolution images, allowing the trust to retain the possibility of raising income from more overtly commercial use of images. Far better, then, to follow Birmingham’s new model, which at a stroke ends all the costly bureaucracy behind image fees. A limit on file size is far more efficient than trying to limit usage or print runs. For most educational publishing purposes, 3MB is a high enough resolution. But if Louis Vuitton want to make more of their Old Master themed handbags, then they’ll need a higher resolution file, and will have to pay for it. – Bendor Grosvenor, Diary of an art historian: at last, some common sense for the abolition of image fees