Thomas Julier at Tithe Hall Ernen and Youth Club Ernen, July 9 – September 24, 2017 via contemporary art daily

The author must give up on aping genius. Rather show the author as ape, the author as idiot. Don’t have the hubris of being the comedian. You are the straight man in this farce; the universe is the funny man. So don’t be silly, cute, crack jokes, or play coy, but allow hilarity, a cleansing painful laughter that splits your sides and your heart. Follow your own foolishness like tracks upon the sand. – Lars Iyer, Nude in your hot tub, facing the abyss (a literary manifesto after the end of literature and manifestos), The White Review , November 2011

Thomas Nagel. What is it like to be a bat?

Seth Price. Redistribution

Saâdane Afif, The Fountain Archives, 2008 – ongoing, http://thefountainarchives.net

Lawrence Weiner, That was the trouble with Aristotle, 2010

Louise Lawler. Prominence Given, Authority Taken

It’s interesting, for instance, how charcoal becomes trendy today in organic and well-being food, even if it’s been fucking up generations of miner’s lungs. Some use it as a natural way to ease stomach pain and bad digestion. I prefer its vomiting effects: it’s used as an emergency treatment for certain kinds of severe poisoning and OD’s. I like that it’s presented here in the shape of a large, family-size bread we could eat of all together, while expelling all the possible mad-driving toxins. The idea of letting go, of fluidity, of opening the valves, a joyful communal diarrhea prompted me to ask the baker how we could form a sort of orifice in the bread. He folded his arm and pushed his elbow far in the middle of the fresh dough. – The Future of Not Working, Aline Bouvy in conversation with Louise Osieka, June 5, 2017

one pic monday. Richard Prince

The power of capital rests on that fiction of a present engendered by art; it is not least thanks to art that capital has become autonomous vis-à-vis politics and production. And the manifest product of this autonomy is the total aestheticization of life, politics, and (philosophical) thinking. It is in response to this aestheticization that we urgently need to consider (poetic) alternatives. – The Speculative End Of The Aesthetic Regime, Armen Avanessian, Texte Zur Kunst, Issue No. 93 / March 2014 „speculation“

Cady Noland

Arthur Jafa, APEX_TNEG, at The MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology (ACT), on February 25, 2013 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUBm2_v5RUw

wfw weekend #412

Seth Price. Wrong Seeing, Odd Thinking, Strange Action

There are very recent instances where, under the law, the wearing of natural hairstyles is not protected from discrimination. (…) In any case, these gestures of using the du-rag in my practice became an entry point for me and hopefully others to better understand the implications of the multiple behaviors, attitudes, reactions, and declarations surrounding a black aesthetic. The du-rag was banned by the National Football League and National Basketball Association in America in the late 1990s / early 2000s, and I am asking why. Because when you ask everyone why, there are a million different answers that either address respectability politics or refer to its relationship to criminality. As if the du-rag was a cause and perpetuator of violence. In the end, it’s worn to protect the hair and condition its texture. It’s similar to hair rollers, which are rarely worn outside, but black folks are creative like that and asked, why not? It became subversive, and the powers that be have been trying to shut it down ever since. – Kevin Beasley, Silence is not neutral, Mousse Magazine, June 2017