Irena Haiduk. Against Biography

Eric Troncy. Very Entertaining

David Hammons is on our mind.

Arriving for the opening of ERIC WESLEY’s survey-scale exhibition at the Los Angeles gallery 356 S. Mission Rd. in January 2015, visitors encountered a new Nissan parked at a rakish angle in the back lot, with its front doors ajar and music blaring from its speakers. That this was an artwork would surely never have occurred to many of those in attendance had it not been for the checklist, where it was designated Infinity Project (Black), 2015, with materials given as “clear lacquer paint on Infiniti.” (…) As a found object that was in fact rented, the vehicle could also be seen as a monument to transience and ephemerality. After the close of the show, one had to imagine the automobile undergoing a further turn in this Duchampian game of contextual transposition, mingling inconspicuously with all the other non-art cars in the rental fleet upon return. Moreover, once replaced within its original context, WESLEY’s Infiniti can only be faced with steady depreciation, the fate of all uncollected cars. – JAN TUMLIR on ERIC WESLEY, Artforum February 2017

Puppies Puppies is inevitably the work of a person born during the rise of the Internet. The rhythm of their life has been established by machines. In some ways, this contradicts the personal and the emotional. But the Internet, especially in the beginning, was also deeply involved with intimacy and emotional connection between strangers. Sex with strangers reveals something very deep about human existence, and maybe coming to know some artists and their activity is like having sex with strangers. – Forrest (husband of Puppies Puppies) in conversation with Tenzing Barshee, Mousse 57 (February–March 2017)

The Peshmerga offensive is a massive engineering enterprise, a monumental Land art operation. Behind each platoon there is a bulldozer waiting. Every hundred meters of gained territory results in hundreds of tons of dry earth pushed forward, all in order to move the front line ever closer to the suburbs of Mosul. Landscape is refashioned daily by the shelling, ISIS’s tunnels are behind, under, and beyond our mobile front line; the dunes are scarred by the infinite lines of trenches while on the Syrian-Iraqi border ISIS’s bulldozers breach a passage through a hill to erase the Sykes–Picot Agreement’s fatal design. The desert is no longer an exotic escape. It’s pure naked exposure. The closest to protection from the snipers is by running from one shadow to another. – Francis Alÿs on his embedment with the Kurdish Army in Mosul, Artforum, February 9, 2017

wfw weekend #381

one pic wednesday. Nairy Baghramian

one message interview #38. KubaParis

These photographs are primarily operative on the level of their content, which is less the subjects depicted or any psychology their bodies might convey but, rather, the gamut of technical tropes and possibilities within studio photography today. And it is through this seeming evacuation of conventional content via formal manipulation, that these shots shed light on our current relation to the world of images. – ILYA LIPKIN on the Photographic Real, 30 January 2017, Texte Zur Kunst

Andrea Fraser

wfw weekend #376

Ajay Kurian. The Ballet of White Victimhood: On Jordan Wolfson, Petroushka, and Donald Trump

Trevor Paglen. Invisible Images (Your Pictures Are Looking at You)

Paul Taylor, Richard Prince, Sherrie Levine