David Hanes. wfw aware #49

Aware: Mars (2018) and Beast (2018), NINA BEIER
presented at Kunstmuseum St Gallen
shot on February 10, 2017, altered on February15 , 2018 by DAVID HANES*
image courtesy of the artist and we find wildness

*DAVID HANES lives and works in Berlin. Read more about this special project for we find wildness here.

The Task (2017), directed by Leigh Ledare, on view at True/False Film Festival, Columbia, Missouri, on March 2-4, 2018

wfw weekend #444

Untitled (2018), MICHAEL E SMITH
seen at Kunstmuseum St.Gallen
on Saturday, February 10, 2018
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #443

Les activités parallèles (2018), ARNAUD WOHLHAUSER
seen at Kunsthaus Langenthal
on Friday, February 2, 2018
image © we find wildness

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Kunsthalle for Music, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, 26 January 2018 – 3 March 2018

I love the idea of context, and also how you make people look at things, of, you know, things that they take for granted. And I remember, when I was a kid, there was a tree on the street that had blown down; it was, like, enormous. I remember being shocked by its size except when it was upright. Every day you walk past it, you never even see it. You know, with the Pharmacy installation, I wanted to get a pharmacy and put it into an art gallery, but one where you actually think you are in a…you know, in a pharmacy. Then, you know, just to… not even confuse you, but it just makes you question everything, but, also at that time, I was thinking about the…I wanted, like, you to believe in art. I wanted, you know, quite desperately for people to believe in art in a way that I believed in it, and I remember being aware that they totally believed in pharmacies, but, you know, walked into art galleries, and went, you know, “All that kind of modern art is rubbish.” I remember thinking that, you know, an art gallery and a pharmacy, you know, there’s no difference, really. It’s just a white room, and you know, they just function differently. One of them is trying to sell you art, the other one is trying to sell you drugs. – Damien Hirst, transcription from Channel 4: Damien Hirst 360 Private View, April 2012

Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein. Bikini, Basel

Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein
exhibition view, Bikini, Basel, 2018

Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein
exhibition view, Bikini, Basel, 2018

Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein
exhibition view, Bikini, Basel, 2018

TOBIAS MADISON, Krawling from the Wreckage, 2017
epson print mounted on aluminium, vinyl sticker, plastic frame, 80 x 80 cm

AMALIA ULMAN, Wheelchair (Los Angeles), 2017
wire, 140 x 90 x 90 cm

JULIAN-JAKOB KNEER, Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein
exhibition view, Bikini, Basel, 2018

ELIN GONZALEZ, Even when you self-destruct, you want to fail more, lose more, die more than others, stink more than others, 2016
styrofoam, acrylic paint, oil paint, acrylic lacquer, 100 x 50 cm

Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein
exhibition view, Bikini, Basel, 2018

Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein
exhibition view, Bikini, Basel, 2018

LOUISA GAGLIARDI & ADAM CRUCES, Pains (2018)
breads, wheels, dimensions variables

JULIAN-JAKOB KNEER, Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein
exhibition view, Bikini, Basel, 2018

ZOE FIELD, Anybunnys Turtle Trouble, 2017
ceramic, steel, enamel, paper, tie, cigarettes

LAURA SCHUSINSKI, Golf (2017) & Walther König (2017)
both: acrylic paint on canvas, plastic bag, 45 x 30 cm

Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein
exhibition view, Bikini, Basel, 2018

ANTOINE RENARD, Untitled (pink), 2018
aluminium, 160 x 155 x 25 cm

all images courtesy of the artists and Bikini, Basel

Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein is a group exhibition that is on view at the artist-run-space Bikini in Basel until February 10, 2018.

The exhibition features the work of BORA AKINCITURK, FRED H. BERGER, CHROMOSOME RESIDENCE, KAMILLA BISCHOF AND LAURA WELKER, ADAM CRUCES AND LOUISA GAGLIARDI, VEIT LAURENT KURZ, AMALIA ULMAN, R. CRUMB, ELIN GONZALEZ, ADAM SHIU-YANG SHAW, TOBIAS MADISON, EVAN MCGRAW, ESBEN WEILE KJÆR, YVES SCHERER, LAURA SCHUSINSKI, NEW NOVETA, JULIAN-JAKOB KNEER, THE GATE, MICHAEL LUBERRY, MARIE LEA LUND, JAN KIEFER, ANTOINE RENARD, ZOË FIELD and MALTE ZANDER.

Jugend ist Trunkenheit ohne Wein has been conceived and curated by JULIAN-JAKOB KNEER.

edit: the exhibition text is available here

wfw weekend #442

Himmel und Meer (2011), KATINKA BOCK
seen at Kunstmuseum Winterthur
on Saturday, January 27, 2018
image © we find wildness

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Michael E. Smith at 500 Capp Street Foundation, San Francisco, November 18, 2017 – February 3, 2018 via contemporary art daily

Candice Lin. A Hard White Body

screen capture from http://www.betonsalon.net/IMG/pdf/bs22-final-complet.pdf
on January 31, 2018
image © we find wildness

A Hard White Body is the title of CANDICE LIN‘s recent exhibition that took place at Bétonsalon in Paris from September 6, to December 23, 2017

CANDICE LIN’s recent show at Bétonsalon in Paris, titled A Hard White Body (Un corps blanc exquis), examines narratives of race, gender, class, and sexuality through the lives and stories of JAMES BALDWIN and JEANNE BARET, as well as through non-human actors, such as porcelain, plants, and glass. The installation includes a video on Lin’s research on plants, materials, and histories of their use in narratives of race and gender; research documents atop a short wall made of bricks; plants throughout the gallery; intricate drawings; and larger drawings that cover the windows of the gallery, occluding parts of the exhibition from the outside while introducing other elements to the inside, namely a life-size drawing of a white body with plants growing out of its stomach; a bed made of porcelain, and a filtration system.

Welcoming visitors at the entrance of the gallery is a urinal connected to a distillation system that processes urine from the urinal and combines it with distilled water and water from the nearby Seine River. Tubes cross the gallery walls, feeding into a set of sprinklers that every hour mist a room that is curtained off as if it were quarantined. The room is based on James Baldwin’s novel, Giovanni’s Room and is replete with mugs, bottles, domestic debris, a bed—all made of unfired clay. In misting, the filtration system (further assisted by gallery workers who spray the room by hand daily) assures perpetual change, a resistance to permanence, to a fixed solid state. – Like Piss in Motion: Race, Gender, and Filtration Systems in the work of Candice Lin, DAN BUSTILLO for http://contemptorary.org/

one pic tuesday. Hans-Jörg Mayer

Accept Baby, 1983

image courtesy of the artist and Forde, Geneva

Over three decades, MAYER’s work suggests that to resist becoming oedipal capitalism’s human waste is futile. One can only run to the bathroom and hope that their mind has enough time to pry open and squeeze out that small dingy bathroom window and survive the long drop into a new and unknown world. Having his particular approach to late capitalism termed as ‘accelerationism’, the British philosopher NICK LAND has suggested that by escalating capitalism’s processes, its fundamental contradictions will be exacerbated and eventually bring the entire system toward an early grave and with it theoretically rationality as its practiced. LAND notes that in the process, schizophrenia should pour forth from every new rift in capitalist reality; he writes, “Schizophrenia creeps out of every box eventually, because ‘there is no schizophrenic specificity or entity, schizophrenia is the universe of productive and reproductive desiring machines, universal primary production.’ It is not merely that schizophrenia is pre- anthropoid. Schizophrenia is pre- mammalian, pre-zoological, pre-biological … It is for those trapped in a constrictive sanity to terminate this regression.” – In Einer Fatalen Welt: Gender, Abjection, and Pessimism in HANS-JOERG-MAYER by MARC LEBLANC, 2013

Accept Baby (1983) by HANS-JOERG MAYER was part of the group exhibition Accept Baby presented at Forde in Geneva from November 25, 2017 to January 7, 2018.

 

Keith Farquhar. Lap Gods

KEITH FARQUHAR, Lap Gods
exhibition view at Office Baroque, Brussel, 2018

Lap God (Costa), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
230 x 100 x 35 cm (90 1/2 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

Lap God (Starbucks Grande), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
190 x 100 x 35 cm (74 3/4 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

Lap God (Starbucks Grande), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
190 x 100 x 35 cm (74 3/4 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

Lap God (Starbucks Grande) (detail), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
190 x 100 x 35 cm (74 3/4 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

Lap God (Starbucks Grande), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
190 x 100 x 35 cm (74 3/4 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

Untitled (LAP GOD), 2014
U.V. direct print on corrugated, galvanised steel
304,8 x 213,4 cm (120 x 84 in.)

Lap God (Venti), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
200 x 100 x 35 cm (78 5/8 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

Lap God (Greggs), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
210 x 100 x 35 cm (82 5/8 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

Lap God (Greggs), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
210 x 100 x 35 cm (82 5/8 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

Lap God (Subway), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
184 x 100 x 35 cm (72 3/8 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

Lap God (Greggs), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
210 x 100 x 35 cm (82 5/8 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

Lap God (Greggs) (detail), 2018
Nylon sleeping bag, toy dog, branded coffee cup
210 x 100 x 35 cm (82 5/8 x 39 1/4 x 13 3/4 in.)

all images courtesy of the artist and Office Baroque, Brussels, Belgium

Lap Gods by KEITH FARQUHAR is on view at Office Baroque in Brussels until February 17, 2018.

wfw weekend #441

detail from the exhibition Friends, MIMOSA ECHARD
seen at Galerie Samy Abraham, Paris
on Wednesday, January 10, 2018
image © we find wildness

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General Intellects with McKenzie Wark, E1: Chantal Mouffe via dis.art

I guess the very existence of the artworld as we know it is hoisted and buttressed by a suspended set of values that must also collapse with the fiction of liberal democracy. And it’s complicated because without the whole circus, none of our work means a thing. The objects become totemic, faith trophies or whatever – at best, that is. At worst, it’s all just a bunch of worthless junk full of stolen tropes and cynical jokes. Most of the problems we spend our time discussing in the artworld are not real problems; they’re philosophical or theological conceits, really, and nothing will change through the value-production-industrial complex of endless panel discussions. The world as we know it may very well be ending, not in the Alt-Right, accelerationist sense but in the Wildersonian afropessimist sense; this would mean the end of the artworld too, of course. We would all have to find some other way to make a living if making a living was still something one did. And/or we would give ourselves wholly to the business of life. There are artistries in everything. But I think again of faith, somehow necessary where art is not. In Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower the main character Lauren Olamina is what I would call an artist, and this helps her survive apocalyptic conditions where others cannot. – Jesse Darling on Faith, Crisis, and Refusal via http://momus.ca/