Il Futuro Era Bellisimo Per Noi. Citè Internationale des Arts, Paris

1_IL FUTURO ERA BELLISSIMO PER NOI_Exhibition View

Il Futuro Era Bellisimo Per Noi, exhibition view
Citè Internationale des Arts, Paris / April – May 2016

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EMMANUEL MARCUCCIO, Untitled (I wanted something calm), 2016
powder coated steel and aluminum

8_IL FUTURO ERA BELLISSIMO PER NOI_Exhibition View

Il Futuro Era Bellisimo Per Noi, exhibition view
Citè Internationale des Arts, Paris / April – May 2016

10_Quintessa Matranga_63rd-77th STEPS

QUINTESSA MATRANGA, Pet (2), 2016
gift paper, box, stickers, ribbons

ANNA FRANCESCHINI, excerpt from Before they break, before they die, they fly! (2014)
16mm film transferred to HD video, color – mute, 5’40”

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JOSIP NOVOSEL, Opportunism (AfterAffection), 2016
canvases, candles

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JOSIP NOVOSEL, Opportunism (AfterAffection), 2016
canvases, candles

16_IL FUTURO ERA BELLISSIMO PER NOI_Exhibition View

Il Futuro Era Bellisimo Per Noi, exhibition view
Citè Internationale des Arts, Paris / April – May 2016

17_Fabio Santacroce_63rd-77th STEPS

FABIO SANTACROCE, Il Futuro Era Bellissimo Per Noi, 2016
stretched canvas prints, i-pad holders, car side window sunshades, chains, chocolate balls, plastic garden fences

19_Ilya Smirnov_63rd-77th STEPS

ILYA SMIRNOV, No Title Provided, 2016
graphite on paper, wood, glass, plywood

20_Cedric Fargues_63rd-77th STEPS

CEDRIC FARGUES, Stigmata, 2016
biscuit and jam

21_Cedric Fargues_63rd-77th STEPS

CEDRIC FARGUES, Stigmata, 2016
biscuit and jam

22_Anna Solal_Kites_63rd-77th STEPS

ANNA SOLAL, Kites, 2016
metal,fabric, thread,cut vinyl decals, ipad screen

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ANNA SOLAL, Kites, 2016
metal,fabric, thread,cut vinyl decals, ipad screen

26_Sean Townley_63rd-77th STEPS

SEAN TOWNLEY, Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathways, 2013
cast urethan, water

28_Mathis Collins_63rd-77th STEPS

MATHIS COLLINS, Lambrequin, 2016
fabric, wine, coffee, lemon, red berries 

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MATHIS COLLINS, Lambrequin, 2016
fabric, wine, coffee, lemon, red berries 
all images courtesy of the artists
photos: QUENTIN DUBRET

Il Futuro Era Bellissimo Per Noi (The Future Was Beautiful For Us) is a group exhibition initiated by the project space  63rd-77th steps that is currently on view at Citè Internationale des Arts in Paris. The show comprises a constellation of works characterized by a shared aesthetic sensibility and approach.

Individually and collectively the artworks – gathered together in the exhibition under a title borrowed from a pop Italian song – appear as post capitalistic yet spiritual, critical and ironic pieces. Whether as soundtrack or as sculptural objects, Il Futuro Era Bellissimo Per Noi evokes a certain bitter resignation that emerges when the notion of desire for a sudden, total, and irrevocable change failed to happen.

 

Il Futuro Era Bellisimo Per Noi with MARIANTONIETTA BAGLIATO, MATHIS COLLINS, CÉDRIC FARGUES, ANNA FRANCESCHINI, FRIEDER HALLER, KAREEM LOTFY, EMANUELE MARCUCCIO, QUINTESSA MATRANGA, JOSIP NOVOSEL, FABIO SANTACROCE, ILYA SMIRNOV, ANNA SOLAL and SEAN TOWNLEY is on view at Citè Internationale des Arts, Paris until 10 May 2016.

 

 

David Hanes. wfw aware #29

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Aware: after The Lovers (2016) , ARCANGELO SASSOLINO
presented at Frankfurter Kunstverein, Frankfurt
shot on April 13, 2016, altered on April 25, 2016 by DAVID HANES*
image courtesy of the artist and we find wildness

*DAVID HANES lives and works in Berlin. He is represented by Birch Contemporary, Toronto.

➝ Read more about this special project for we find wildness here.

Orit Gat. Could Reading Be Looking?

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For e-flux journal #72 (april 2016), writer ORIT GAT examines the forms of informative texts you can find in exhibitions and how these labels, press releases or wall texts among others can become source of works.

You can read the entire text via http://www.e-flux.com/journal/could-reading-be-looking/

Dominic Samsworth. Lounge Elopes

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all images courtesy of the artist and Galerie Jeanroch Dard, Brussels

You enter a room. The scene is somehow familiar. There appears to be a couch and a series of wall works. The couch is occupied by empty oyster shells recovered by a glossy transparent pvc. The forms on the wall are reduced and minimal yet aerial.  They have been hung higher than usual. You understand that it would be perfect to sit on the sofa to see them. But you can’t.

Although this installation is loaded with antisocial conditions, Lounge Elopes by DOMINIC SAMSWORTH is only complete when and until the viewer stepped into the room. Only at this moment could the installation be complete as a picture, which is that of a person looking into a space both abstract and figurative. Thanks to an open press release, the exhibition tells us nothing about anywhere else except where the viewer is. There’s no story other than the one he is in, nowhere else to go.

Lounge Elopes by DOMINIC SAMSWORTH is on view at Galerie Jeanroch Dard, Brussels until June 4, 2016.

 

 

wfw weekend #301

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Plaster Jacket (Pepe/Hilux) (2016), MATIAS FALDBAKKEN
seen at Eva Presenhuber, Zürich
on Wednesday, April 20, 2016
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #300

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detail from Black Xenoestrogens (Tin, Chromium, Bisphenol A, PVC) (2015), JULIETTE BONNEVIOT
seen at Rotwand Gallery, Zürich
on Wednesday, April 20, 2016
image © we find wildness

 

one message interview #22. Elise Lammer

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Curating exhibitions that weave experimental connections between works, mediation and audience, independent curator ELISE LAMMER has produced Hotel Palenque (2011-ongoing); Kunsthalle Roveredo (2013-ongoing); The forgotten memory guide IV/IX (2014) for the Fahrenheit Foundation, Los Angeles; and *MIRRORS* (2016) presented at DUVE, Berlin among others curatorial projects. Since 2014 she is associate curator of Salts in Basel.

Please note that two solo exhibitions (HAGAR SCHMIDHALTER and FLAKA HALITIS) open tonight at Salts.

 

Sanna Helena Berger. The edge must be scalloped

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all images courtesy of the artist and Diorama, Oslo

– 

The particular context and dynamics of art viewing brings about a heightened sense of self in the viewer; she tends to feel as much on display as the objects that surround her. This observation should ring familiar to anyone who frequent contemporary art events and venues with any regularity. For her exhibition The edge must be scalloped at Diorama, SANNA HELENA BERGER has created a situation that aims to provoke and intensify precisely this alternation between scrutinizing and coming under scrutiny that signifies our interaction with art.

Rather than the evisceration of the viewing body’s carnal aspects—a desired effect famously attributed to the white cube construct by BRIAN O’DOHERTY—what the carefully honed atmosphere we encounter in art venues actually produce, experientially speaking, is physical discomfort. We’ve all seen it and tried to pull it off : the pretense of ease. Most would testify that to be in the presence of art, whether it’s a daytime visit to a museum or going to an opening, is tethered to a nagging feeling of exposure. What is inspired by art displays and their attending rituals, is not an interrogation after the meaning or value of the intentionally crafted and displayed works, but a questioning of the claim to importance of the sweaty-palmed inter- rogator him- or herself—in short: self-doubt.

(…)

The edge must be scalloped by SANNA HELENA BERGER was on view from April 1 to April 29, 2016 at Diorama in Oslo.

*excerpt from the press release

Domenico de Chirico pick #61

all images courtesy of the Artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York

a solo exhibition by MICHAEL E.SMITH
on view at Andrew Kreps Gallery in New York
until May 7, 2016

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

one pic tuesday. Brad Troemel

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Victorian Gingerbread Home #2 and 1,500 Dubia Roaches, 2016
gingerbread, royal icing, assorted candies, coconut shreds, roaches, styrofoam, paper towels, plexiglass and stainless steel, 77.5 x 61 x 8.9 cm
courtesy of Feuer/Mesler, New York

If I would dare to describe the practice of BRAD TROEMEL, I would probably used adjectives such rebellious, anarchic, conceptual and ironic. A few years ago I would have probably used the term ‘punk’ to define his offline and online activities, which now include baking gingerbread houses.

TROEMEL used art and his art as a tool for subverting verbal and visual logic. His new body of work currently presented at Feuer/Mesler in New York is no exception. Entitled New and Handmade By Me, the show presents a series of sculpture and wall works, each exploring different methods of DIY fabrication pulled from both Pinterest tutorials and Survivalist communities. According to TROEMEL, the works ‘he chose to make for this exhibition are based on Pinterest tutorials where the end result wasn’t fully known in advance. These were tutorials that opened up the process to a greater degree of customization, randomization, and innovation’.

The group of works that emerges from this labour-DIY mode of production (which was available to follow via his instagram) and especially its alignment of value with craftsmanship, is a rather sharp comment to conservatism.

I’m always thinking about how to make a living. How can I continue making the art I want to make, get exhibitions, and pay my bills/student loans? I have a pretty zealous habit of bankrupting myself in the process of making these new exhibitions, with high stakes plans that the money will come back to me via sales. It’s not gambling if you make your own luck. The biggest expense in making new work is that you have to buy new materials and figure out how to use them from scratch, which usually requires buying more and more of that material until you know how to work it just right. Failed material tests lead to what I call production schedule “traffic jams” in money, space, and time where potential ideas outpace the material possibilities of what you can work on at a given point. Ever try driving a U-Haul in New York? The traffic is terrible. – BRAD TROEMEL for the press release of New and Handmade By Me at Feuer / Mesler

New and Handmade By Me BRAD TROEMEL is on view at Feuer/Mesler in New York until May 8, 2016.

wfw weekend #299

excerpt from Countdown Belladonna, ANNA K.E and FLORIAN MEISENBERG
seen at Salon Kennedy, Frankfurt
on Wednesday, April 13, 2016
video courtesy of the artists

 

wfw weekend #298

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exhibition detail from More Heat Than Light, SAM LEWITT
seen at Kunsthalle Basel
on Thursday, April 6, 2016
image © we find wildness

Domenico de Chirico pick #60

all images courtesy of the artist and Koppe Astner, Glasgow
images by PATRICK JAMESON

Pussycat, a solo exhibition by MATTHEW SMITH
on view at Koppe Astner in Glasgow
until May 31, 2016

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

one pic thursday. Daniel Turner

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Untitled, 2016
nickel, brass, adhesive tape
21 x 192 x 3 inches | 53.3 x 487.6 x 7.6 cm
image Courtesy Franklin Parrasch Gallery, New York

In his work, DANIEL TURNER – who was trained as a painter (btw: in 2006 he burnt all the paintings he had produced since 1997 in an action called ‘Burning an Entire Body of Work‘) – seems to disrupt art from its hierarchical and modernist structure thanks to a minimal and conceptual investigation of materials.

For this exhibition entitled 110/120TURNER placed an ‘accumulation of polished, nickel-plated brass rods cast diagonally upon the floor’. Stacked upon each other, the rods at once appear precious, individually treated, but also very much discarded and disposed of in the context of an empty domestic room. This work as a whole, gives the impression of abandonment. Human presence is absent, yet man’s discarded wastes now mix with this vacant bourgeois space.

110/120 by DANIEL TURNER is on view at Franklin Parrasch Gallery in New York until May 14, 2016.

Bea Fremderman & Andrew Laumann. Machine in the Garden

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BEA FREMDERMAN & ANDREW LAUMANN, Machine in the Garden
installation view at Springsteen Gallery, Baltimore, March – April 2016

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BEA FREMDERMAN & ANDREW LAUMANN, Machine in the Garden
installation view at Springsteen Gallery, Baltimore, March – April 2016

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ANDREW LAUMANN
Untitled (Morpho), 2015
methylcellulose, acrylic, spraypaint & paper on wood panel in acrylic float frame, 60”x40”

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BEA FREMDERMAN
Untitled, 2016
found Clothing, sprouts, dimensions variable

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BEA FREMDERMAN & ANDREW LAUMANN, Machine in the Garden
installation view at Springsteen Gallery, Baltimore, March – April 2016

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BEA FREMDERMAN
Untitled, 2016
found Clothing, sprouts, dimensions variable

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BEA FREMDERMAN & ANDREW LAUMANN, Machine in the Garden
installation view at Springsteen Gallery, Baltimore, March – April 2016

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BEA FREMDERMAN
Untitled, 2016
found Clothing, sprouts, dimensions variable

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BEA FREMDERMAN
Untitled, 2016
locally sourced stones, locally sourced sticks

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BEA FREMDERMAN & ANDREW LAUMANN, Machine in the Garden
installation view at Springsteen Gallery, Baltimore, March – April 2016

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BEA FREMDERMAN & ANDREW LAUMANN, Machine in the Garden
installation view at Springsteen Gallery, Baltimore, March – April 2016

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BEA FREMDERMAN & ANDREW LAUMANN, Machine in the Garden
installation view at Springsteen Gallery, Baltimore, March – April 2016

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BEA FREMDERMAN
Untitled, 2016
found Clothing, sprouts, dimensions variable

all images courtesy of the artists and Springsteen Gallery, Baltimore

Machine in the Garden fluidly combines the work of BEA FREMDERMAN, which consists of an ephemeral sprouts installation, with a series of wall pieces by ANDREW LAUMANN.

While FREMDERMAN is using found garments to grow sprouts, ANDREW LAUMANN‘s works look like scratch posters you can find in the streets. These composition are made by tearing off layers of sheets of papers that have been previously glued together. Both artists are creating works in which natural elements follow artificial processes, and in which the passage of time acquires a fundamental role, if not a certain vandalistic tendency.

Thanks to its title and the works presented, one can find similarity to what CAROLYN CHRISTOV-BAKARGIEV wrote in her essay Worldly Worlding: The Imaginal Fields of Science / Art and Making Patterns Together (Mousse Magazine #43):

(..) I argue instead (as I also argued with dOCUMENTA (13) in 2012) for a broader vision of the situation, and for alliances between art and organic life, new materialisms, and scientific studies, so that forms of art and forms of life can be combined, sharing architectural and creative knowledge with bees and butterflies and beavers, with bacteria and microbes, with eukaryotic cells as well as with software; cobbling together desires, sensibilities and abilities on a par with the microcosmic world within our bodies and the macrocosmic “music of the spheres” in a multi-species dimension, extending the “we” to all living sentient beings (Margulis, Tristan Garcia). This neocybernetic, ecological perspective is committed to pleasure, imagination, sensuality, expression, and play, joined to a sense of justice in the world, foregrounding diversity, complexity, depth, appreciation, equanimity, and compassion, rather than the depletion of the world’s potential, stupidity, fascism, extinction, monoculture, unhappiness, fear, conflict, suicide, the death drive, and the exercise of hoarding, control, and power. This is not a “naturistic” backlash against the urban or the artificial, a turn which would simply be neo-Romantic, even detrimental to the scope of becoming-with, and of doing so outside the frames of current production/distribution/finance systems. It is not that I celebrated “Nature” in some neo-Romantic way in dOCUMENTA (13). It’s more that there is no difference between nature and culture. Even a painting is made of subatomic particles that go through certain reactions in space. So a painting is not exactly a human-made thing, but the fruit of combined agencies (Latour). It is only partially a human-made thing. Anything that’s in the world comes from something else, so everything is culture, or everything is nature, depending on how you wish to define these words.

Machine in the Garden by BEA FREMDERMAN and ANDREW LAUMANN is currently presented at Springsteen Gallery in Baltimore until April 23, 2016.