Anna-Sophie Berger. Places to fight and to make up

ANNA-SOPHIE BERGER, Places to fight and to make up
exhibition view at mums, Wien, October 2016 – January 2017
photo: mumok/KLAUS PICHLE

ANNA-SOPHIE BERGER, Places to fight and to make up
exhibition view at mums, Wien, October 2016 – January 2017
photo: mumok/KLAUS PICHLE

ANNA-SOPHIE BERGER, Places to fight and to make up
exhibition view at mums, Wien, October 2016 – January 2017
photo: mumok/KLAUS PICHLE

Parabolic Reflector (1), 2016
concrete, spray paint, 180 x 140 x 45 cm
courtesy of the artist and JTT New York

ANNA-SOPHIE BERGER, Places to fight and to make up
exhibition view at mums, Wien, October 2016 – January 2017
photo: mumok/KLAUS PICHLE

Choicest Relic (1), 2016
paper, water, wooden frame, 142,5 x 181 cm
courtesy of the artist and JTT New York 

Pea Earring, 2016
pea seed, sterling silver, 0,6 x 0,6 x 1,3 cm
courtesy of the artist and JTT New York

Agony half-hourly, 2016
ale-bench, dimensions variable
courtesy of the artist and JTT New York

Back when I moved to my apartment in the 3rd district, the Golden Harp pub was still Café Goldengel—subtitled »Kommunikations Café.« People who moved here later, like my sister, who took my apartment after I left Vienna, don’t remember it usually. The »Kommunikations Café« aspect is what had me confused about Café Goldengel. It suspended the place somewhere in between a swingers’ club and a fake coffee house. 

(…)

Three restaurants make up a conglomerate of 3rd district mostly middle-class living, from Rochus, the restaurant by the market, with its syntaxless menu composed of dishes described by nouns (chicken, salad, basil, balsamico), via Iridion, the overbooked Greek restaurant populated with doped waiters, their pupils as deep as oceans (the only thing anyone ever seems to remember from this part of town: »aber den guten Griechen habt ihr!«). Finally too, Goldengel turned into Golden Harp, spatially in bad limbo almost by the canal. For all I remember Goldengel was mostly empty. I never went in.

(…)

The paved path that separates the park from the subway station building is lined by trees. The park is configured as an attempt to construct a place around an area without a center. The proximity to the subway station building, with its fans and ventilation systems conspicuously relating to dust and dirt, make it unthinkable to spend more than a moment there, to stay longer than waiting. It is just within this non-space that two concrete parabolic reflectors have been installed.

Sourced from a company called Richter Spielgeräte GmbH, which specializes in large outdoor toys and activity tools, the parabolic reflectors directly refer to the dimensions of the area. They signify the parameter of need- ing thirty meters of distance between each other to function as »communicative toys.« If a person speaks right into the middle of one mirror, a second person, thirty meters away, will hear their voice as if standing right next to them. It is a phenomenon of acoustics that comes close to magic when first experienced. They are mostly used as a canvas for tags and graffiti—like a communication gone awry. The parabolic reflectors came to mean to me something more complex than a well-meant social imperative to »enjoy« a space. Like silent symbols, they waited patiently for us if we needed them. We had a ritual, to use them to fight and to make up.

Place to fight and to make up by ANNA-SOPHIE BERGER is on view at mumok, Vienna until January 29, 2017.

Luis Ortega Govela, Olivia Erlanger. Hate Suburbia

LUIS ORTEGA GOVELA, OLIVIA ERLANGER, Hate Suburbia
lecture on October 20, 2016 at Architectural Association School of Architecture, London

One of my family myths is that my dad started his small business in the garage of our two-storey house in the middle of nowhere in Switzerland. But if I try to recall the year he said he started, I see myself clearly in front of a tv being bottle feed with American entertainment culture, but not a single trace of my dad doing stuff in the garage. Not even fixing the mower. Although I can precisely tell you how long I needed to finish Super Mario Land with the game boy.

Contemporary culture had an idealized and globalised picture of the American Dream where a company could be started from nothing by anyone in the garage. My dad included. Hate Suburbia is all about this imagery and its architecture in suburban areas in America.

Hate Suburbia is a project by London based architect LUIS ORTEGA GOVELA  who is also one of the founders of the collective åyr (previously AIRBNB Pavilion) and New-York based artist OLIVER ERLANGER.

Please note that the book will be launch in New York at 83 Pitt St. on the weekend of January 28, 2017. Meanwhile I really recommend to read the discussion they had with BIANCA HEUSER for 032c.

#laterpost 1996. Ayşe Erkmen at Portikus, Frankfurt am Main

Zuspiel, 1996

image courtesy of the artist and Portikus, Frankfurt am Main

In 1996 AYŞE ERKMEN has placed, in the frame of an exhibition entitled Zuspiel, seven security gates, so-called metal-detectors at the entrance portals of the art venue Portikus in Frankfurt am Main. According to the press release the entrance area was thus transformed to a security zone, in which the detectors indicated whether the exhibition visitors had metal with them through shrill sounds and light signals. The detectors’ sounds of alert were not followed by the refusal of admission; rather, the visitor became aware of his or her physical presence and  of the space surrounding him or her’.

In a more recent interview she gave for Flash Art Magazine in 2011, the artist explained:

The only thing that is inevitable in my work is my process: the things that I come across in any given situation I use to think through. I don’t always know what I will find in advance and what my feelings and interest will be towards what I find. If I find something of interest and significance, this can be the inevitable. But it changes immensely from one project to another. One can also say that the one inevitable aspect of my work is my constant and precise attention to and interest in form. I think this is the part that communicates, and I feel the form should be arresting to the viewer. How it communicates and what it communicates can be vastly different.

AYŞE ERKMEN‘ last solo exhibition entitled Unlikely was on view at Barbara Gross Galerie in Munich  from October 28 to January 14, 2016.

wfw weekend #372

exhibition view 2B Dosenwelt, MANFRED PERNICE
seen at Kunstmuseum St Gallen
on Saturday, January 14, 2017
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #371

Wrathful Diety (Rusty) (2016), STEFAN TCHEREPNIN
seen at Galerie Francesca Pia, Zürich
on Friday, January 6, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Domenico de Chirico for We Find Wildness #78

all images courtesy the artist and Lyles & King, New York

Bad Color Book, a solo exhibition by FARLEY AGUILAR
on view at Lyles & King in New York
until February 12, 2017

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

Ian Wilson. The Discussions

pages from IAN WILSON, The Discussions

published by the Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, in collaboration with Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA) and Musée d’art moderne et contemporain (Mamco), Geneva, with support by Jan Mot, Brussels, 2008

images courtesy we find wildness

After a few sculptural works and paintings in the early 60’s, IAN WILSON discovered that thinking and talking about his objects had as he said ‘ a greater abstraction’ than reproducing the works themselves. He then concentrated exclusively on his long-term project entitled The Discussions. The first Discussion took place in 1968 in LAWRENCE WEINER’s studio. Since then WILSON has conducted Discussions in galleries, museums, and homes internationally. Neither recorded nor transcribed, their only physical manifestation is a certificate signed by the artist marking the time, date and location of their happening and may be subsequently purchased by individuals or institutions.

I probably benefit more from the Discussions than the participants do, because I remember everything that is said, even if I do not answer immediately. If it is a good remark I cannot integrate it directly but after the Discussion I try to do that, often I’ll be doing that for months. The ideas I get from the audience have a great influence because the Discussions are a work in progress, I am very easily influenced by everyone who makes a critical comment that points out the weakness in the logical structure, or something else, it isn’t always a question of logic. It is a peculiar activity, I don’t quite understand it myself either. An artist wishes to communicate. You write and I am preoccupied with ‘speech’. I am interested in the shape of ideas as they are expressed, spontaneously, at the moment itself. By concentrating on spoken language as an art form I have become more distinctly aware that I as an artist am a part of the world. – IAN WILSON interviewed by OSCAR VAN DEN BOOGAARD, 2002

In 2006 the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven proposed to document IAN WILSON‘s work into a catalogue raisonné containing all of his discussions from 1968 until 2008. In the book, every discussion is documented separately providing factual informations as well as personal impressions of participants.

Please note that the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin will examine WILSON‘s practice through three corresponding solo presentations by HANNE LIPPARD, ADAM PENDLETON, and PAUL ELLIMAN. According to the press release his work ‘will be physically and conceptually embedded within each exhibition, serving as a framework for exploring roles of language and communication, and the broader significance of interaction between human beings. The exhibition is therefore in constant flux and changes gradually throughout the course of its duration‘.

IAN WILSON at  KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin is on view from January 20 to May 14, 2017.

one pic wednesday. Manfred Pernice

MANFRED PERNICE, 2B Dosenwelt
installation view at Kunstmuseum St.Gallen

image courtesy of the artist and Kunstmuseum St.Gallen, photo: SEBASTIAN STADLER

MANFRED PERNICE is best known for his cans (dosen) pieces which consist of cylindrical sculptures made out of low-budget materials such as plywood, laminated fiberboard or cardboard. These works are very often set on wheels and are temporarily assembled together into ‘can fields’ for exhibitions. PERNICE is always loading these cans or containers with historical, social, but also personal references.

When I began making the cans, I didn’t have a precise idea of where they would go. The cans seemed banal, but now I’m happy to have them. In my work, making cans is an attempt to create a kind of order, even in a nonsensical way. The can is a working process, a tool or method for dividing up elements into separate parts that can subsequently be brought together in different ways. Some cans are numbered, and these numbers reappear on the walls beside photographs and texts that I have collected, establishing certain relationships with history. When I place the cans together in a given room, it’s like creating a chemical reaction that will affect the various elements in unknown ways. I’m curious to see how the cans will work in a particular space—and that goes for the contents of each can as well as how they relate to one another. Since the cans are movable and can be linked to any set of found documents, they offer many possibilities for seeing how events react upon one another. – MANFRED PERNICE in conversation with JENNIFER ALLEN, Artforum 

2B Dosenwelt by MANFRED PERNICE is on view at Kunstmuseum St.Gallen until February 19, 2017.

 

#laterpost 2008. Koenraad Dedobbeleer & Rita McBride at Kunsthalle Bern

KOENRAAD DEDOBBELEER & RITA MCBRIDE, Hall
exhibition view at Kunsthalle Bern, October-November 2008

KOENRAAD DEDOBBELEER & RITA MCBRIDE, Hall
exhibition view at Kunsthalle Bern, October-November 2008

KOENRAAD DEDOBBELEER & RITA MCBRIDE, Hall
exhibition view at Kunsthalle Bern, October-November 2008

KOENRAAD DEDOBBELEER & RITA MCBRIDE, Hall
exhibition view at Kunsthalle Bern, October-November 2008

KOENRAAD DEDOBBELEER & RITA MCBRIDE, Hall
exhibition view at Kunsthalle Bern, October-November 2008

all images courtesy Kunsthalle Bern

Under the direction of PHILIPPE PIROTTE MUT, the Kunsthalle Bern hosted in the end of 2008 an exhibition by American artist RITA MCBRIDE and Belgian artist KOENRAAD DEDOBBELEER.

This exhibition knew its first instalment earlier in 2008 at the Frac Bourgogne in Dijon for which curator EVA GONZALEZ-SANCHO invited the artists to collaborate. The show then travelled to the Kunsthalle in Bern, where it was presented under the title Hall.

RITA MCBRIDE & KOENRAAD DEDOBBELEER took over the first floor of the Kunsthalle with two large works that included the reproduction of service station called a ‘roof shelter’ based on MCBRIDE‘s photographs, as well as a wooden frame of the attic of a residential block in which DEDOBBELEER was living. These two works were concentrated into two rooms from the five available on the first floor and thus leaving the exhibition space empty. The visitors were entering the installation which was looking like a film set or a stage as members of the public and as actor at the same time.

Hall by RITA MCBRIDE & KOENRAAD DEDOBBELEER was on view at Kunsthalle Bern from October 4 to November 30, 2008. Please note that DEDOBBELEER will be on view at Mai 36 Galerie in Zürich from January 12 to March 4, 2017.

wfw weekend #370

WHEREWITHAL | WAS ES BRAUCHT exhibition view , LAWRENCE WEINER
seen at Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria
on Thursday, December 29, 2016
image © we find wildness

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David Hanes. wfw aware #40

Aware: after Freeports (2016)AGATHA VALKYRIE ICE (DOROTA GAWEDA, EGLÉ KULBOKAITÉ)
presented at Salts, Basel
shot on December 10, 2016, altered on January 5, 2017 by DAVID HANES*
image courtesy of the artist and we find wildness

*DAVID HANES lives and works in Berlin. He is represented by Birch Contemporary, Toronto.

➝ read more about this special project for we find wildness here.

actual_size #10. Willem de Rooij

 

Fong Leng Sportswear, ca. 1985-1995
installation view MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt am Main, 2016
Courtesy of the artist, photo: AXEL SCHNEIDER

The image above features a tracksuit currently shown at MMK Frankfurt in the solo exhibition of WILLEM DE ROOIJ. The piece of outfit has been actually produced in the eighties by a Sino-Dutch designer called FONG-LENG. Since more than ten years, DE ROOIJ is collecting FONG-LENG’ sportswear which are presented in the exhibition in several groups of one, two, or three mannequins onto pedestals.

FONG-LENG was best known in the Netherlands for creating couture objects for exclusive clients. From the mid-’80s to the mid-’90s, she started to collaborate with large labels and thus to open her brand to a wider audience. Her work inevitably shifted to ‘something made for the few’ to ‘something made for the many’. DE ROOIJ is not only interested into this transition of audience which had effects on FONG-LENG’s artistic outputs but also into abstract ideas of different cultures such african printing techniques, navajo formal elements or chinese inspired embroideries (cf image above) that those clothes are carrying.

WILLEM DE ROOIJ is sharing his fascination for these garments without layers of mediation, not trying to claim ownership other than putting them into a different context.

Entitled by WILLEM DE ROOIJ is on view at MMK, Frankfurt am Main until January 8, 2017.

 

 

Ajay Kurian. The Ballet of White Victimhood: On Jordan Wolfson, Petroushka, and Donald Trump

In the beginning of November 2016 the website Artspace published a text by AJAY KURIAN in which the American artist was reflecting about the work of another American artist specifically JORDAN WOLFSON. The text is based on WOLFSON‘s piece Colored Sculpture (2016) which consists of a cartoonish animatronic of a redheaded boy dangling over the ground, suspended from thick chains that snaked across the floor.

Colored Sculpture (2016) is on view at Stedelijk in Amsterdam until January 29, 2017. Make sure to read KURIAN‘s text in full via ArtSpace.

Julian Charrière. First Light

Savannah Shed, 2016
concrete, detector shield, scintillation pectometer, crocodile, tape
installation view at Galerie Tschudi, Zuoz, 2016/2017

Polygon XVIII, 2014
black and white double exposure medium format film on baryta paper, steel frame, lead, glass, thermonuclear strata, negative, 150 x 180 cm
unique (the owner of the work get the negatif and some stones from the site in a lead tube)

JULIAN CHARRIÈRE, First Light
installation view at Galerie Tschudi, Zuoz, 2016/2017

Tropisme, 2015
frozen plant, refrigerated showcase, 208 x 66 x 66 cm

Pacific Fiction – Study for Monument, 2016
coconut Sarcophagi, 128 cm high in a steel frame of 227 x 203 cm, overall size: 330 x 440 cm
unique (Model for Monument for Marshall Island)

JULIAN CHARRIÈRE, First Light
installation view at Galerie Tschudi, Zuoz, 2016/2017

Bravo – First Light, 2016
archival pigment print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag, mounted on aluminium Dibond, red Palmira veneered frame, Mirogard anti-reflective glass, 153.8 x 191.3 cm (framed), unique

Able – First Light, 2016
archival pigment print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag, mounted on aluminium Dibond, red Palmira veneered frame, Mirogard anti-reflective glass, 153.8 x 191.3 cm (framed)

JULIAN CHARRIÈRE, First Light
installation view at Galerie Tschudi, Zuoz, 2016/2017

Lost at Sea – Pikini-Fragment, 2016
high pollished stainless steel, coral sand, mutated bikinian coconut, glass, 175 x 32 x 32 cm

Iroojrilik, 2016
video, 24 min, Sound Edward Davenport

all images courtesy of the artist and Galerie Tschudi, Zuoz

Imagine the scenery: Switzerland, the fresh air, the mountains, the snow, the chalets. In this idyllic context, JULIAN CHARRIÈRE is currently presenting a new body of work that is the result from his expedition to radioactive and abandoned sites.

Entitled First Light, the presentation is featuring CHARRIÈRE‘s objects, videos and prints that are reflecting particularly upon the landscape and ecology of Bikini Atoll in the Marshall archipelago. A dramatic paradise where no less than 67 nuclear tests have been carried out from 1946 to 1958, including the explosion of the first H-bomb (1952).

During this period, bombs delivering a combined fission yield of 42.2 megatons were detonated. The force of one of these, ‘Castle Bravo’, was enough to vaporize two islands, and gouge a massive crater – measuring 2000 metres in diameter – out of the primordial reef. Another, codenamed ‘Baker’, threw a fleet of 70 captured and decommissioned WW2 battleships – some of them up to 250 metres long – up into the air. A few were ripped to shreds. Others, like the USS Saratoga and the HIJMS Nagato – storied flagships of the US and Japanese navies – eventually sank to the bottom, where their rusting hulks remain today. During this period, obliterated geology would become radioctive particles, carried on the wind to then fall on communities in neighbouring atollsMeanwhile, the people of Bikini, who had been ‘asked’ to temporarily leave their home to make way for a series of experiments ventured ‘for the good of mankind and to end all wars’ began to learn the meaning of an exile and dispossession that continues until present. Today, the atoll’s islands bear architectural scars that stand as profane registers of this program and its unresolved consequences; a series of concrete bunkers, jutting out from the shore or hidden beneath jungle. ‘ (excerpt from the press release)

First Light by JULIAN CHARRIÈRE is on view at Galerie Tschudi, Zuoz until March 18, 2017.

Michael Krebber. Flat Finish

MICHAEL KREBBER, Flat Finish at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, 2016 
courtesy: Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

MICHAEL KREBBER, Flat Finish at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, 2016 
courtesy: Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

MICHAEL KREBBER, Flat Finish at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, 2016 
courtesy: Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

MICHAEL KREBBER, Flat Finish at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, 2016 
courtesy: Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

MICHAEL KREBBER, Flat Finish at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, 2016 
courtesy: Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

MICHAEL KREBBER, Flat Finish at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, 2016 
courtesy: Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

MICHAEL KREBBER, Flat Finish at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, 2016 
courtesy: Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

MICHAEL KREBBER, Flat Finish at Galerie Buchholz, Cologne, 2016 
courtesy: Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

 

Flat Finish was the title of a solo show by MICHAEL KREBBER. The exhibition consisted in two simultaneous presentations at Galerie Buchholz in Berlin and Cologne this autumn. Both spaces featured each a series of 50 works on paper impeccably framed and exactly hung in the same way. This new body of work consists exclusively of small drawings in pencil and pen. They are minimal lines drawn by hand on ruled sheets of paper. The lines are loose and inaccurate as if the artist had failed at the simple exercise of following the printed lines as well as at the impossible task of thwarting them.

The exhibitions at Buchholz galleries are now closed. Please note that KREBBER‘s work is currently the subject of a survey show titled The Living Wedge at Museo Serralves in Porto, Portugal on view through January 15, 2017. This exhibition will travel to the Kunsthalle Bern from February 18 to April 30, 2017.