David Hanes. wfw aware #34

DHanes_Week33_2016

Aware: after Frank Stella’s Cat (1992), STEVEN PARRINO
presented at Frac Bourgogne, Dijon
shot on July 6, 2016, altered on July 25, 2016 by DAVID HANES*
image courtesy of the artist and we find wildness

*DAVID HANES lives and works in Berlin. He is represented by Birch Contemporary, Toronto.

➝ read more about this special project for we find wildness here.

wfw weekend #326

isagenzken_mmk

detail from Schauspieler II (2014), ISA GENZKEN
seen at MMK, Frankfurt am Main
on Saturday, July 24, 2016
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #325

cadynoland-mamco

Untitled (1999), CADY NOLAND
seen at Mamco, Geneva
on Thursday, July 21, 2016
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #324

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Aware n°642 (2016) , DAVID HANES*
seen at Schwarzwaldallee, Basel
on Friday, July 22, 2016
image © we find wildness

*DAVID HANES is also a regular contributor for wfw with the series Aware

Barbara Casavecchia. Hiding in Plain Sight

Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 16.49.26

The whole essay entitled Hiding in Plain Sight and written by BARBARA CASAVECCHIA, has been published in Spike Art magazine #48 Summer 2016. It is also available online: http://www.spikeartmagazine.com/en/articles/essay-hiding-plain-sight

I also recommend to read the Balconism Manifesto (2014) by CONSTANT DULLAART via http://artpapers.org/feature_articles/feature3_2014_0304.html.

Natalie Czech. One can’t have it both ways and both ways is the only way I want it.

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CLOCK / SEAGRAM’S, 2016
color print, resin, glue, 56 × 83 cm
Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin et Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

natalie-czech-cracalsace-20

from left to right:

PEN / PR SHIRT, 2016
color print, resin, glue, 70,5 × 152,9 cm

JEANS / HOUSE, 2016
color print, resin, glue, 135 x 81 cm

CLOCK / SEAGRAM’S, 2016
color print, resin, glue, 56 × 83 cm

AVATAR / WE, 2016
color print, resin, glue, 128,1 × 87,8 cm

Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

natalie-czech-cracalsace-19

PEN / PR SHIRT, 2016
color print, resin, glue, 70,5 × 152,9 cm

JEANS / HOUSE, 2016
color print, resin, glue, 135 x 81 cm

Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

natalie-czech-cracalsace-18

JEANS / HOUSE, 2016
color print, resin, glue, 135 x 81 cm

Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

natalie-czech-cracalsace-15

A POEM BY REPETITION BY BRUCE ANDREWS, 2013
3 color prints, 58 x 68,1 cm chaque

Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

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CAMERA / FJÄLLRÄVEN, 2016
print color, resin, glue, 73,5 × 101,6 cm
Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

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from left to right:

PAPERDRAFT, 2015
color print, resin, glue, 116,6 × 81 cm

NOZZLE CHECK, 2015
color print, resin, glue, 70 x 93 cm ; 71 x 97 cm

CAMERA / FJÄLLRÄVEN, 2016
print color, resin, glue, 73,5 × 101,6 cm

Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

natalie-czech-cracalsace-11

from left to right:

A CRITIC’S BOUQUET BY VINCENZO LATRONICO FOR THE EDITOR, 2015
print color, 110 x 82,5 cm

A CRITIC’S BOUQUET BY VANESSA DESCLAUX FOR MARC CAMILLE CHAIMOWICZ, 2015
print color, 110 x 82,5 cm
A CRITIC’S BOUQUET BY RACHEL VALINSKY FOR CAMILLE HENROT, 2015
print color, 110 x 82,5 cm

A CRITIC’S BOUQUET BY HILI PERLSON FOR BERLINDE DE BRUYCKERE, 2015
print color, 110 x 82,5 cm

Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

30

A CRITIC’S BOUQUET BY PETER SCOTT FOR FISCHLI WEISS, 2015
color print, 110 x 82,5 cm
Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

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from left to right:

A POEM BY REPETITION BY VSEVOLOD NEKRASOV II, 2015
2 color prints, 65,5 x 103 cm each
Collection Josée & Marc Gensollen

A POEM BY REPETITION BY ARAM SAROYAN, 2013
3 color prints, 67 x 67 cm ; 67 x 17,7 cm ; 67 x 20,5 cm
Collection particulière

A POEM BY REPETITION BY ROBERT GRENIER, 2014
2 color prints, 62 × 89 cm each
Courtesy de l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

A POEM BY REPETITION BY ROBERT CREELEY #3, 2013
2 color prints, 114 x 76,3 cm ; 130,6 x 76,7 cm
Courtesy de l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

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from left to right:

A POEM BY REPETITION BY BRUCE HAINLEY, 2013
3 color prints, 134,4 × 79,9 each
Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

A POEM BY REPETITION BY CID CORMAN, 2015
2 color prints, 89 x 59,4 cm ; 81 x 54 cm
Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

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A POEM BY REPETITION BY VSEVOLOD NEKRASOV (RED), 2016
2 color prints, 81 x 102 cm ; 81 x 102 cm
Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

06

IL PLEUT, 1916 (GUILLAUME APOLLINAIRE)

natalie-czech-cracalsace

A POEM BY REPETITION BY CHARLES BERNSTEIN, 2015
4 color prints, each 56 x 41,5 cm
Courtesy l’artiste, Capitain Petzel, Berlin and Kadel Willborn, Düsseldorf

all images: AURELIEN MOLE 

NATALIE CZECH: One can’t have it both ways and both ways is the only way I want it. is currently on view at the Crac in Altkirch. The solo exhibition reveals, over the two floors of the Art Centre, a latent reality thanks to several conceptual photographic series such as Hidden Poems (2010-2012), Poems by Repetition (2013-2016), Il pleut by Guillaume Apollinaire (2012), Voyelles (2013), Critics’ Bouquets (2015) and most recently To [Icon], (2015-2016). All of those works posit the existence of texts and images floating around on everyday objects and existing print materials that CZECH collides and bounces with each others.

My works propose different spaces and different entry levels, and allow various forms of perception and interaction. By this, I mean a space in between, which is difficult to define, one that touches a simultaneous reading and seeing in pieces or fragments and allows space for different associations. Since I see no hierarchy between the poem, the surrounding text, and the picture, I am rather interested in the similarities in their creative processes and in activating the boundaries of their respective mediums. What are the photographer and the writer able to do and where are the interfaces or superimpositions?. – NATALIE CZECH for Bomb Magazine, October 2014

Since the very act of reading is nothing but the word-by-word mental restitution of a text through a series of snapshots, her body of work that fuses written words and images coexisting yet separated from each other in some fashion, leads the viewer into infinitely loopable images.

One can’t have it both ways and both ways is the only way I want it. by NATALIE CZECH is on view at Crac Alsace, Altkirch until September 18, 2016.

actual_size #8. Jean-Charles de Quillacq

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Les Petites Filles, 2015
c-print diasec, 59 x 46,5 cm
image courtesy the artist

This work is not part of the solo exhibition of JEAN-CHARLES DE QUILLACQ that is currently presented at the Parisian gallery Marcelle Alix. It has been shown in the group exhibition entitled L’Après-Midi (curated by MATHIEU MERCIER) almost a year at the Villa Arson, where he was resident of the 5/7 program from 2013 to 2015.

Je t’embrasse tous is on view at Marcelle Alix in Paris until 23 July 2016. Please note also that his work Le mème is presented in the gardens of Cité de la Céramique de Sèvres as part as Sèvres Outdoors until October 23.

found via https://chroniquecuriosite.wordpress.com

wfw weekend #323

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still from Untitled (Monkey) (2010), KLARA LIDÉN
seen in the group exhibition Detail is All
at Kunsthalle Mainz
on Sunday, July 3
image Courtesy the artist and Galerie Neu, Berlin

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wfw weekend #322

laure-prouvost-dijon

Grand Ma’s dream (2013), LAURE PROUVOST
seen at Le Consortium, Dijon
on Wednesday, July 6, 2016
image © we find wildness

Cameron Rowland. Indirect Benefit

PICTURE WITHDRAWN

CAMERON ROWLAND, Indirect Benefit, Fri Art 2016
photo: MAX REITMEIER

PICTURE WITHDRAWN

1st Defense NFPA 1977, 2011, 2016
Nomex fire suit, distributed by CALPIA, 50 x 13 x 8 inches
rental at cost

PICTURE WITHDRAWN

Leveler (Extension) Rings for Manhole Openings, 2016
cast aluminium, pallet, distributed by Corcraft, 118 x 127 x 11 inches
rental at cost

PICTURE WITHDRAWN

New York State Unified Court System, 2016
oak wood, distributed by Corcraft, 165 x 57.5 x 36 inches
rental at cost

PICTURE WITHDRAWN

Insurance, 2016
container lashing bars, Lloyd’s Register certficates, 102 x 96 x 11.5 or 149 x 18 x 4.5 inches
photo: we find wildness

PICTURE WITHDRAWN

Insurance, 2016 (detail)
container lashing bars, Lloyd’s Register certficates, 102 x 96 x 11.5 or 149 x 18 x 4.5 inches

all images: courtesy the artist and Fri Art, Fribourg
photos: MAX REITMEIER (unless stated otherwise)

Domenico de Chirico for We Find Wildness #69

all images courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
photography: BRIAN FORREST (installation views) & LEE THOMPSON (individual works)

A comb a hole, a solo exhibition by VALENTIN CARRON
on view at David Kordansky Gallery in Los Angeles
until July 16, 2016

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

one message interview #27. Attilia Fattori Franchini

click on the phone to read the entire message

When ATTILIA FATTORI FRANCHINI is not curating exhibitions, she is involved into offline and online art venues.  Try to catch her via http://attiliaff.com

read the previous one message interviews here

one pic tuesday. Lydia Ourahmane

Lydia-Ourahmane-The-Third-Choir-back-2014-2015-copy

The Third Choir, 2014
sound installation, 3m x 5m 
20x Naftal Oil Barrels imported from Algeria, CZ-5HE Radio Transmitter, 20x Samsung E2121B Phones
image courtesy the artist 

After eight months planning and preparing for the realisation of the export, corresponding with shipping agencies in the UK and Algeria, I went over in April to collect the barrels and load the container which I had secured for shipping on 1 May 2014. Once I got there the first problem was sourcing them, as these specific blue and yellow barrels had recently been put out of production due to a change of shares within the oil company Naftal, subsequently including the branding. The person I had organised to purchase the original twenty barrels from had sold them by the time I got there and said he hadn’t seen more than one or two in the past few months, so this turned out to be a strange mission impossible. I was driving around, calling cousins in other towns to enquire, or call people they knew to ask if they had seen any of these barrels. So in the end most of them were purchased singularly, from various scrap yards, mechanics, old petrol stations off the motorways, building sites, people’s homes etc. The complications actually began when I went to the customs in Oran to try to process the clearance for the container, which had previously been scheduled to leave in six days. I knew it would be a problem if I was to be specific about the use of the items as I knew that exporting anything affiliated with ‘art’ from Algeria had been illegal since the implementation of a law restricting the movement of art in 1962, so I listed the export as the movement of personal goods. This was declined as they could not categorise empty metal barrels as personal items, along with the following six proposals which were variations of this; I was trying to submit them for clearance under different categories or sub-categories of personal exports, such as using them as part of an ‘architectural plan’ or ‘to make musical instruments’. All of which were declined, due to an obvious suspicion on the variations of the consecutive submissions for custom clearance on the same items. 

The experience of constantly and consistently being at the mercy of someone else, within ranks of relative bureaucracies, and where technically nothing within your own power can shift that register. I think these restrictions are extremely interesting to work within, from the exterior, but equally in turn to find where there is potential. I really understood, to an extent, the finality which exists within ‘frustration’, making the idea of perseverance frantic or slightly deranged. It resulted in me needing permission from the Minister of Culture in Algeria to authorise the export when I had finally come out with the truth about the use of the items for an artwork, as otherwise it would have been impossible. It took six weeks of relaying phone-calls, emails, faxes between different customs offices in different cities as no one wanted to take responsibility in signing the authorisation, even though it had been granted permission as a cultural export.

The movement of these objects between borders and the laws and legislations which governed this was important for the work, that it faced these difficulties which gave it a momentum and energy that it may not have gathered if the process was straightforward.LYDIA OURAHMANE in conversation with ADRIAN LEE, ArtVehicle 67

LYDIA OURAHMANE is part of the group exhibition Répétition currently on view at Villa Empain in Brussels until August 21, 2016. Please note also that she will be part of the exhibition that a body knows regardless which opens at Interstate Projects in Brooklyn on Thursday July 14, 2016.

Reinhard Mucha

Ohne Titel (MILCH) – 1:1 Modell des ausjurierten Beitrags zu „Kunst am Bau – Eingeladener Wettbewerb“ für die Volkswagen Universitätsbibliothek der Technischen Universität und der Universität der Künste Berlin 2004, [2014] 1979

Ohne Titel (MILCH) – 1:1 Modell des ausjurierten Beitrags zu „Kunst am Bau – Eingeladener Wettbewerb“ für die Volkswagen Universitätsbibliothek der Technischen Universität und der Universität der Künste Berlin 2004, [2014] 1979

Ohne Titel (MILCH) – 1:1 Modell des ausjurierten Beitrags zu „Kunst am Bau – Eingeladener Wettbewerb“ für die Volkswagen Universitätsbibliothek der Technischen Universität und der Universität der Künste Berlin 2004, [2014] 1979

mgk_manual5_mucha_Web-2

spread from the exhibition’s manual
browse manual 5

Frankfurter Block, [2016] 2014, 2012

Frankfurter Block, [2016] 2014, 2012

Versuchsanordnung II zu Ohne Titel (Reinhard Mucha – Die Letzten werden die Letzten sein – Nationalgalerie Berlin 1982), Für Mies van der Rohe, [2013] 2008

Versuchsanordnung II zu Ohne Titel (Reinhard Mucha – Die Letzten werden die Letzten sein – Nationalgalerie Berlin 1982), Für Mies van der Rohe, [2013] 2008

mgk_manual5_mucha_Web

 

spread from the exhibition’s manual
browse manual 5

Since his debut in the 80’s, German artist REINHARD MUCHA has made the museum a subject. He explained in a short video produced by the SF Moma in 2015 that his work tried to cannibalize the idea of the institution in order to make it clear the fact of being in a museum.

By reworking earlier pieces, using documentations and material infrastructures that have supported and sustained previous installations, REINHARD MUCHA‘s works aim ‘to show the show’ as he said.

The centrepiece of his current solo exhibition presented at Kunstmuseum Basel is called Frankfurter Block [2016] [2014], 2012, and unites twelves works that he originally created between 1981 and 2014. This installation first appeared at Frankfurt’s Galerie Grässlin in 2012, then the piece has been recreated and complemented for the Galerie Sprüth Magers in Berlin in 2014. For the exhibition in Basel, this ensemble has been supplemented by four monitors displaying video-animated photos of three exhibition venues, where the pieces included in the Frankfurter Block [2016] [2014], 2012 have been previously shown.

In this ongoing process of condensation and aggregation that now spans three decades, some materials appear old-fashioned, while others are proving their relevance and persistence. In its current totality, his work is a fascinating witness of how MUCHA is wrestling with a plurality of times, materials and trajectories.

REINHARD MUCHA is on view the Kunstmuseum Basel until October 16, 2016.  A manual of this exhibition is available online here.

wfw weekend #321

amy-sillman

detail from All-Over (2016), AMY SILLMAN
seen at Portikus, Frankfurt am Main
on Saturday, July 2, 2016
image © we find wildness

view more images of this exhibition on the wfw instagram