Domenico de Chirico pick #55

all images courtesy the artist and Interstate Projects, Brooklyn


Master’s Chambers, a solo exhibition by SYDNEY SHEN
on view at Interstate Projects in Brooklyn
until February 21, 2016

please note also that the work is further augmented in the form of a downloadable horror-survival video game via  http://masterschambers.info/

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

 

 

wfw sound #7. Enrico Boccioletti

– 

It was a special New Year’s Eve. My family dressed a table with strass and paillette.
In the middle, a magnum of champagne was enthroned. The sticker 2 0 0 0 had the 0s turbaned together shaping a chic signature. Daddy gave me 15€, my first ones, he went to exchange for 100 francs. There was no informatics bug, no end of the world, but a new money.
Entitled La Crème (2016), this new wfw sound created by artist ENRICO BOCCIOLETTI revolves, according to the artist, around ‘the survivors’ legacy of the ongoing European “soft apocalypse”, which gently started at the overtaking moment between the 1990s and the 2000s’. The sound is mainly connected to a text (two excerpts are here published) that BOCCIOLETTI wrote together with MARION GOIX for an upcoming publication entitled DID I BORN THE 31 DEC 1999? (2016).
May the end be invisible? Might all the bridges and buildings, all the monuments and palaces, start to crumble when they began to be represented? New soft powers, where iconoclasm and iconolatry coincide. May the end be absence of explanation, or the excess of description?
 –

one message interview #17. Louisa Gagliardi & Adam Cruces

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LOUISA GAGLIARDI and ADAM CRUCES are a couple and both artists in their own right. Since a few days, their work is reunited in the exhibition Over and Under that is presented at MonCHERI in Brussels until March 5, 2016.

http://louisagagliardi.com/
http://www.adamcruces.com/

 

one pic monday. Lina Viste Grønli

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Pentimento Kelloggs (Raisin Bran), 2016
Kelloggs Raisin Bran, US pennies, silicone, 30 x 20 x 5,5 cm

image courtesy of Christian Andersen, Copenhagen)

One of the most recent pentimento discovered comes from the seminal Black Square (1915) by MALEVICH. After an x-ray analysis in 2015, the experts at Moscow’s Tretyakov Gallery discovered two previous paintings and an inscription beneath the monochrome.

According to wikipedia, ‘a pentimento is an alteration in a painting, evidenced by traces of previous work, showing that the artist has changed his or her mind as to the composition during the process of painting. The word is Italian for repentance, from the verb pentirsi, meaning to repent’.

Pentimento is also the title of the new solo exhibition by LINA VISTE GRØNLI presented in Copenhagen at Christian Andersen. The show features a series of everyday objects entirely or partly recovered with US pennies.

Like for the Swiss five-centime piece or the one cent euro, the unit cost of producing and shipping this type of coins exceed the face value of the coin. Additionally these pieces are mostly often handed out as change but rarely used for payment, which means they are hoarded in piggy banks and in drawers, effectively withdrawing them from circulation, obliging the mint to produce more.

Like for her previous works, LINA VISTE GRØNLI assembles everyday objects, here a cereal box and US pennies, with the painting term pentimento and thus creates something new in a rather witty way.

Pentimento is on view at Christian Andersen, Copenhagen until March 5, 2016

David Hanes. wfw aware moment #22

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Aware: after the exhibition On Occasion by CEAL FLOYER
presented at Kunsthaus Aarau
shot on February 2, 2016, altered on February 4, 2016 by DAVID HANES*
image courtesy of the artist and we find wildness

*DAVID HANES lives and works in Berlin. He is represented by Birch Contemporary, Toronto.

➝ Read more about this special project for we find wildness here.

Domenico de Chirico pick #54

all images: Courtesy the artist and Jenny’s, Los Angeles
photography JEFF MCLANE


King and Slave, a solo exhibition by JULIEN CECCALDI
on view at Jenny’s in Los Angeles
until March 5, 2016

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

Niklas Lichti. BioLife

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NIKLAS LICHTI, BioLife
installation view, Galerie Emanuel Layr, 2016

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BioLife, 2016, steel, custom-made jumpsuit, lamp, jacket, plaster mask and tyvek on sandblasted glass,
150 x 120 x 250cm

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BioLife, 2016, steel, custom-made jumpsuit, lamp, jacket, plaster mask and tyvek on sandblasted glass,
150 x 120 x 250cm

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NIKLAS LICHTI, BioLife
installation view, Galerie Emanuel Layr, 2016

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NIKLAS LICHTI, BioLife
installation view, Galerie Emanuel Layr, 2016

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NIKLAS LICHTI, BioLife
installation view, Galerie Emanuel Layr, 2016

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NIKLAS LICHTI, BioLife
installation view, Galerie Emanuel Layr, 2016

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NIKLAS LICHTI, BioLife
installation view, Galerie Emanuel Layr, 2016

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BioLife, 2016, steel, custom-made jumpsuit, engraved glass and lamp, 83 x 53 x 85 cm

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BioLife, 2016, Steel, custom-made jumpsuit, engraved glass and lamp, 83 x 53 x 85 cm

all images: courtesy of the artist and Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna
photos by GEORG PETERMICHL

For once I won’t write anything about this exhibition but I will really encourage you to read the press release below written by NIKLAS LICHTI for his solo exhibition at Galerie Emanuel Layr in Vienna.

We usually see a lot of shoes, trouser legs, asphalt, trash, grass, leaves and roots. And inside your houses its socks, toes, table and chair legs, food scraps and crumbs that we eat off the ground. We see dust under cupboards and in corners, we know what’s hiding under the sofa and our view out the window is of the sky. If we look at you we see deep into your nostrils where there is nothing of any interest to us. We are indifferent to your shame but sometimes we see stray hairs where you have missed a spot shaving. We follow your gaze and see what you look at, and what you overlook.

I saw a film recently, and shortly afterwards I went to the museum. I enjoyed the film a lot more the first time – back then I left the cinema entranced. It felt like it had been projected right onto my retinas and was burned there forever. Outside it was spring and the streets were full of people, and I imagined the projection would be superimposed over all my experiences from here on. Each person or animal I encountered would be forced into the film’s dramaturgy because my eyeballs were held hostage, and when I looked up at you, even your nostrils were suddenly interesting. I regretted not being able to hold a camera, although I wouldn’t have been able to capture it anyway. All I could do was extend our walk, sniffing trees and street corners, making the occasional wrong turn and lingering at intersections. You didn’t seem bothered as the weather was warm and you were in no hurry, but I feared that at home I would be left with only your feet to relate to, which in my current state would be excruciatingly dull. By the next day the film had detached itself from my retinas and was drifting into memory, where over the years it threatened to sink into oblivion.

Then the other day – 8 years later in your life, 56 in mine – as we sat in the cinema again watching the same film, my taste had clearly changed. By halfway through I found myself staring at the backs of your heads and scanning the ground for snacks. The remainder of the movie stretched out before me in infinite dog-hours. It was cold when we got outside and the salt-strewn pavements cut burning little wounds into my callused feet and both of us were keen to get home.

I rarely visit the museum and when I do I generally find everything hung far too high for me to be the target audience for the pictures. So I turn to the floor or the chairs set out for the custodians. To me, the institution expresses itself through its seating, and sometimes there are cookie crumbs to discreetly lick from the floor.

But that day at the museum I had the feeling that for the first time, we were really there together. There were no chairs or crumbs and the floor offered little so I sat beside you and observed you looking at a picture. I think we looked good together. At this moment I felt the need to tell you that animals keep pets too, I don’t think you know this but ants herd aphids grazing on plants in order to milk their honeydew. The picture was of a horse rearing over the fallen Saint Paul. For you his frightened expression represented the shock of his encounter with God, for me it was his fear of being trampled by the horse. There was no need to argue about it but neither of us wanted to stay any longer so we headed home. On this day I tried everything in my power to avoid you having to pick up my excrement.

BioLife is on view at Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna until February 27, 2016

actual_size #5. Ceal Floyer

image

Monochrome Till Receipt (White), 1998/2016
Swiss version (unique), ink on paper, fixative, dimensions variable
image courtesy of the artist and Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau
photo: TIMO ULLMANN, Aarau

Monochrome Till Receipt (White) (1998/2016) is a work by CEAL FLOYER that is part of her solo exhibition currently presented at the Kunsthaus Aarau.

If I had to choose one work that is representative of this exhibition entitled On Occasion, it would be  Monochrome Till Receipt (White) (1998/2016).  This work is exactly what you think it is: a receipt from a Swiss supermarket chain called Coop. The work lists name of ordinary goods that FLOYER purchased on January 21 in Aarau. Like its title indicates, the receipt is a white monochrome because all the objects the British artist bought comprised items that are all white or have the word ‘white’ in their name. As the whole exhibition, Monochrome Till Receipt (White) is minimal, reduced, site-specific, ironic and truly funny.

I really recommend to read a short text that DAVID RUSSELL wrote last year about this ongoing series started by FLOYER in 1998.

On Occasion by CEAL FLOYER is on view at Kunsthaus Aarau until April 10, 2016

 

Domenico de Chirico pick #53

all images courtesy the artist and Various Small Fires, Los Angeles

Bay of Smokes, a solo exhibition by AMY YAO
presented at Various Small Fires in Los Angeles
on view until March 5, 2016

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

wfw weekend #279

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Love Vibe (1999-2014), ROCHELLE FEINSTEIN
seen at Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva
on Saturday, January 30, 2016
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #278

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The Darknet Shopper – The Bots Collection (2015), !MEDIENGRUPPE BITNIK
seen at Art Geneve
on Saturday, January 30, 2016
image © we find wildness

wfw sound #6. Agatha Valkyrie Ice (chapter 4)

As a final point, here is the last chapter of the series of mixes selected by AGATHA VALKYRIE ICE. I hope you enjoyed as much as I did listening to these wild playlists. If you have missed the previous wfw sounds, you can listen to them here or via https://soundcloud.com/wefindwildness, enjoy!

 

 

one message interview #16. Martin Kohout

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MARTIN KOHOUT is a Czech artist. He is based in Berlin. And among other projects, he is presenting a solo exhibition in Basel. A new show which includes a series of cages inhabited by different cricket species and which continues the artist’s inquiry on the roles we assume as viewers and participants. Jokes Machines Make About Humans: 2nd infusion is on view at Kunst Raum Riehen until February 28, 2016

http://www.martinkohout.com/

➝ follow this link for more informations about the ‘one message interview’ project

David Hanes. wfw aware moment #22

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Aware: after the exhibition Forest by BETHAN HUWS
presented at Kunsthalle Karlsruhe, Germany
shot on January 16, 2016, altered on January 25, 2016 by DAVID HANES*
image courtesy of the artist and we find wildness

*DAVID HANES lives and works in Berlin. He is represented by Birch Contemporary, Toronto.

➝ Read more about this special project for we find wildness here.

Marina Pinsky. Dyed Channel

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MARINE PINSKY, installation view Dyed Channel, view on Landscape (Pharmakon I–XXIV), 2014–15, Kunsthalle Basel, 2016. photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

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MARINE PINSKY, installation view Dyed Channel, view on Landscape (Pharmakon I–XXIV), 2014–15, Kunsthalle Basel, 2016. photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

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Pharmakon XXIV, 2015 (detail)
photo: HUGARD & VANOVERSCHELDE

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Pharmakon XVI, 2015 (detail)
photo: HUGARD & VANOVERSCHELDE

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MARINE PINSKY, installation view Dyed Channel, Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

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MARINE PINSKY, installation view Dyed Channel, Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

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MARINE PINSKY, installation view Dyed Channel, Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

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MARINE PINSKY, installation view Dyed Channel, Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

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MARINE PINSKY, installation view Dyed Channel, Kunsthalle Basel, 2016
photo: PHILIPP HÄNGER

All works Courtesy MARINA PINSKY and C L E A R I N G New York, Brussels

MARINA PINSKY‘s solo exhibition at Kunsthalle Basel brings in light three domains closely tied to the city’s power structure, namely architecture, pharmaceutical industry and culture. For this show entitled Dyed ChannelPINSKY took up the opportunity to explore in depth the formal research by visiting various museums and sites in the city.

In particular, PINSKY focused on a certain number of objects which have to do with the region’s pharmaceutical past and present. Perhaps the most obvious work is Landscape (Pharmakon I–XXIV) (2014–15). It consists of a series of oversized pill tablets laying on the floor or leaned against the walls. The sculptural pieces contain soft colored ceramic pills onto which are imprinted the contours of some architectural views from Basel. The materiality, the color as well as the texture of the sculptures recall the pastilles of sealed earth produced around 500 B.C by pharmacists in the belief that, if ingested, they could absorb toxins in the body.

Nevertheless the works of MARINA PINSKY even connected in her original sources to Basel, evade historical or sociological linearity in favor of an approach based on free associations. In the fourth room for example, she sets up a dialogue between two works; Decoy (2014) and the series of prints entitled Rhine Riverbed (2015). The photographs consist of pictures the artist took in the Rhine and which are overlaid with found images of Swiss fish specimens. According to the press release, these images surround ‘Decoy, a scale model of a boat that the artist once saw in a decoy museum, covered in imitation ducks and with a lowered hatch meant to hide a duck hunter. In her copy of this strange lure, the artist has hidden a cellphone jammer.’ Once again the layered semantic structure makes way for a rather humorous and yet absurd approach.

Thanks to precise assemblages of critical gestures and forms, Dyed Channel seems to question state power, corporate power and finally art-historical power that not only shape the Basler landscape but also form in a more global sense the contemporary art scene.

Dyed Channel by MARINA PINSKY is on view at Kunsthalle Basel until April 10, 2016