If I can’t sleep at night is it because I am awake in someone else’s room?_ a final performance inside a hotel room _ Friday, July 28, 2017, 9 pm to 11 pm at Hotel Zoo Berlin

Katinka Bock. _o_o__o

KATINKA BOCK, _o_o__o
installation view at Mercer Union, Toronto, 2017


Danielle, ceramic, cable, 2017
Cameron, ceramic, PVC tube, 2017
Sinistra o destra, 2017, b/w photograph, dyptic (left)
courtesy Galerie Jocelyn Wolff Paris


G, bronze, 2017
Sinistra o destra, 2017, b/w photograph, dyptic (right) 
courtesy Galerie Jocelyn Wolff Paris

KATINKA BOCK, _o_o__o
installation view at Mercer Union, Toronto, 2017


Hot Fountain, 2017
electric heater, PVC tube, tap water, ceramic
courtesy Galerie Jocelyn Wolff Paris


Hot Fountain, 2017
electric heater, PVC tube, tap water, ceramic
courtesy Galerie Jocelyn Wolff Paris

Liegende, 2017
glass, mattress coil, ceramic, walnut
courtesy Galerie Jocelyn Wolff Paris

Liegende (detail), 2017
glass, mattress coil, ceramic, walnut
courtesy Galerie Jocelyn Wolff Paris

Liegende (detail), 2017
glass, mattress coil, ceramic, walnut
courtesy Galerie Jocelyn Wolff Paris

Cool Fountain, 2017
ceramic, PVC tube, tap water
courtesy Galerie Jocelyn Wolff Paris

all images courtesy of the artist, Mercer Union, Toronto and Galerie Jocelyn Wolff, Paris

Art works have their own existence. They do not document reality, they are a part of it. And they are, like our life, subject to constant change. Documents are fragments, they are part of something else. Each has its reason for being, it relays its own experience of time and space. I like unstable and fragile images because they provide a particular perspective. The work can change within the social and physical circumstances that surround it. Movement in time and space generates a void. This void means the disappearance of meaning and the material, but it also produces something new, a horizon. – KATINKA BOCK in conversation with NAZLI GÜRLEK, 2011

 

_o_o__o, a solo exhibition by KATINKA BOCK is on view at Mercer Union, Toronto until August 12, 2017.

Yung Chong BaDboI for We Find Wildness #2

image courtesy Yung Chong and We Find Wildness

Read more about this special project by Yung Chong BaDboI  for we find wildness here. Make sure also to explore the complete Yung Chong comics collection via his instagram or tumblr.

one pic friday. Michael E. Smith

installation view at S.M.A.K, Gent, June – October 2017
photo credit: MICHAEL E. SMITH, Courtesy KOW Berlin and the artist

Each time I encounter the work of MICHAEL E.SMITH, I have a word that comes to my mind: reenactment. I like to think that MICHAEL E.SMITH is creating sculptures following some sort of transcripts of objects, images and existing artworks. That he is using those transcripts as raw material, as a legitimate source with which to build an abstraction. That is to say that he seems to do his best to reenact the objects or images as closely as possible to their transcript. I want to believe that his final objects are fairly accurate to the existing ones although in a degraded way.  And it is in the exhibition space that the abstract aspect, the narrative and speculations, come into play.

The work of MICHAEL E.SMITH is on view at S.M.A.K in Gent until October 1, 2020.

After Kathy Acker, Chris Kraus, The MIT Press, July 2017 https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/after-kathy-acker

Louise Lawler. Prominence Given, Authority Taken

screen capture from https://www.academia.edu/5599317/Prominence_Given_Authority_Taken_An_Interview_with_Louise_Lawler
on July 18, 2017
image © we find wildness

The whole interview between American artist LOUISE LAWLER and art critic DOUGLAS CRIMP that has been published in Grey Room No. 4 in 2001 is available in pdf via https://www.academia.edu/5599317/Prominence_Given_Authority_Taken_An_Interview_with_Louise_Lawler.

Please note also that the Museum of Modern Art in New York is currently presenting a major survey of LOUISE LAWLER on view through July 30, 2017.

DNA is an excellent medium for archiving data. Recent efforts have illustrated the potential for information storage in DNA using synthesized oligonucleotides assembled in vitro. A relatively unexplored avenue of information storage in DNA is the ability to write information into the genome of a living cell by the addition of nucleotides over time. (…) Here we use the CRISPR–Cas system to encode the pixel values of black and white images and a short movie into the genomes of a population of living bacteria. – CRISPR–Cas encoding of a digital movie into the genomes of a population of living bacteria, Shipman, S. L., Nivala, J., Macklis, J. D. & Church, G. M. Nature, July 12, 2017

Reena Spaulings. Her And No

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

Post Card (Cologne on Rhine) (I), 2010
detail, diptych, acrylic on canvas, 20 x 15 x 12 cm
Courtesy of the artist, and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

Post Card (Cologne on Rhine) (II), 2010
detail, diptych, acrylic on canvas, 20 x 15 x 12 cm
Courtesy of the artist, and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

 

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

Later Seascapes 9, 2015
acrylic on canvas, 250 x 450 x 5 cm
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Neu, Berlin

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

Advisors, Detail 1 (Eleanor Cayre), 2016
acrylic on Dibond, 86,4 x 66 cm
Courtesy of the artist, Private Collection and Campoli Presti, London/Paris

Advisors, Detail 12 (Suzanne Modica), 2016
acrylic on Dibond, 86,4 x 66 cm
Courtesy of the artist, Private Collection and Campoli Presti, London/Paris

HERE AND NOW at Museum Ludwig: Reena Spaulings. HER AND NO
Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 2017
Courtesy of the artist
photo: Rheinisches Bildarchiv Köln, Cologne, BRITTA SCHLIER

Bonjour!, 2017
courtesy of the artist

REENA SPAULINGS is a fictional entity created in 2004 without a face and for unique point of reference a fiction written by BERNADETTE CORPORATION . The now ageless artist based in New York, whose identity has been dissolved by several activities including an art gallery (Reena Spaulings Fine Art) and perpetual collaborations, is showing her work into a solo exhibition in Cologne.

Entitled Her And No, the presentation at Museum Ludwig includes, according to the press release, ‘new works, new ver­sions of ex­ist­ing se­ries of works, and ex­ist­ing works’ that undermine, as with much of SPAULINGS‘ works, traditional notions of authorship and artistic styles.

Her And No by REENA SPAULINGS is on view at Museum Ludwig in Cologne until August 27, 2017.

It’s interesting, for instance, how charcoal becomes trendy today in organic and well-being food, even if it’s been fucking up generations of miner’s lungs. Some use it as a natural way to ease stomach pain and bad digestion. I prefer its vomiting effects: it’s used as an emergency treatment for certain kinds of severe poisoning and OD’s. I like that it’s presented here in the shape of a large, family-size bread we could eat of all together, while expelling all the possible mad-driving toxins. The idea of letting go, of fluidity, of opening the valves, a joyful communal diarrhea prompted me to ask the baker how we could form a sort of orifice in the bread. He folded his arm and pushed his elbow far in the middle of the fresh dough. – The Future of Not Working, Aline Bouvy in conversation with Louise Osieka, June 5, 2017

one pic monday. Richard Prince

Newspaper Photography. NYT’S. Today (8 July 2017), RICHARD PRINCE

image courtesy RICHARD PRINCE

The image of today is a picture posted by RICHARD PRINCE on July 8, 2017 on his twitter. It is a reshot by PRINCE from a photography by DAVID YOUNG/DPA that has been published by the New York Times on July 8, 2017.

Rephotography is a technique for stealing (pirating) already existing images,  simulating rather than copying them, “managing” rather than quoting them, re-producing their effect and look as naturally as they had been produced when they first appeared. A resemblance more than a reproduction, a rephotograph is essentially an appropriation of what’s already real about an existing image and an attempt to add on or additionalize this reality onto something more real, a virtuoso real, a reality that has the chances of looking real, but a reality that doesn’t have any chances of being real. The technique is a physical activity which locates an individual behind a camera, a place from which the individual can view nothing but the collected image, a place that affords the opportunity to view exactly how the audience will eventually see the image as an object and a location from which it is possible for an individual to identify him or herself as much as an audience as an author.excerpt from RICHARD PRINCE, Practising Without A Licence, 1977

Is the act of rephotographing already existing images still a relevant theft?

 

wfw weekend #416

detail from La grand invasion des peuples et des meubles (2017), LUTZ & GUGGISBERG
seen at Bellelay Abbey,
on Sunday, July 2, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #415

Yard – from zero to sixty mph (1961 – 2017), ALLAN KAPROW & SAN KELLER
seen at Kunsthaus, Zürich
on Saturday, July 8, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Robert Grosvenor at Maccarone, Los Angeles

ROBERT GROSVENOR
exhibtion view at Maccarone, Los Angeles, July – September 2017

Untitled, 1997
stone, concrete, steel, glass
54 x 369.5 x 100 inches (137.2 x 938.5 x 254 cm)
Courtesy of Robert Grosvenor, Maccarone New York/Los Angeles and  Paul Cooper Gallery, New York

Untitled, 1991
steel, concrete block, fiberglass and plastic
87 x 42.5 x 86 inches (221 x 108 x 218.4 cm)
Courtesy of Robert Grosvenor, Maccarone New York/Los Angeles and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Untitled, 2016
plywood, aluminum, steel, fiberglass and plexiglass
84 x 360 x 240 inches (213.4 x 914.4 x 609.6 cm) (7′ x 30′ x 20′)
Courtesy of Robert Grosvenor, Maccarone New York/Los Angeles and  Paul Cooper Gallery, New York

Untitled (detail),  2016
plywood, aluminum, steel, fiberglass and plexiglass
84 x 360 x 240 inches (213.4 x 914.4 x 609.6 cm) (7′ x 30′ x 20′)
Courtesy of Robert Grosvenor, Maccarone New York/Los Angeles and  Paul Cooper Gallery, New York

ROBERT GROSVENOR‘s work can exist in a museum. Or on a driveway. Or in a barn. Or whatever. In other words, GROSVENOR‘s sculptures seem to still function as real things in the world, and not as some extraneous objects to be placed on a pedestal. Similarly, many of the materials he is using are familiar, industrial and found. GROSVENOR‘s arrangements display singular yet familiar structures and forms while emphasizing the use-value of materials as well as the traces of time on their surfaces.

Maccarone in Los Angeles is currently presenting an exhibition by ROBERT GROSVENOR. This solo exhibition is on view until September 30, 2017.

one pic wednesday. Jiří Kovanda

 

The power of capital rests on that fiction of a present engendered by art; it is not least thanks to art that capital has become autonomous vis-à-vis politics and production. And the manifest product of this autonomy is the total aestheticization of life, politics, and (philosophical) thinking. It is in response to this aestheticization that we urgently need to consider (poetic) alternatives. – The Speculative End Of The Aesthetic Regime, Armen Avanessian, Texte Zur Kunst, Issue No. 93 / March 2014 „speculation“