#laterpost 1993. Olafur Eliasson

Come As You Are, 1993
Courtesy of the artist

Metaphorically and literally blinded by the lights, I never looked at the work of OLAFUR ELIASSON under a witty point of view until I stumbled upon one of his first piece.

Entitled Come As You Are (1993), this installation consisted of a modified projector projecting a horizontal beam of red light at ELIASSON’s eye level onto a doorway in a studio.

I have sensed a danger in phenomenology’s being presented as a kind of truth; there’s a tendency to detach experience from social context by justifying it as a phenomenological situation. And it is a more dynamic conception of phenomenology, of course, that has been a source of inspiration in my work. To me the greatest potential of phenomenology lies in the idea that subjectivity is always susceptible to change. I like to think that my work can return criticality to the viewer as a tool for negotiating and reevaluating the environment—and that this can pave the way for a more causal relationship with our surroundings. – OLAFUR ELIASSON in conversation with ROBERT IRWIN, March 27–28, 2006

Monia Ben Hamouda. Macelleria Antonio Miranda, Milan

Nur Xyderiv (Go Flex), detail, 2017

installation view at Macelleria Antonio Miranda, Milan

Survive, Adapt and Protect (Just Breath), 2017

Survive, Adapt and Protect (Just Breath), 2017

Survive, Adapt and Protect (You’ll Never be Missed), 2017
plastic band, clay, silicone, water, MICHELE GABRIELE’s ‘The Missing Link’

Survive, Adapt and Protect (You’ll Never be Missed), 2017
plastic band, clay, silicone, water, MICHELE GABRIELE’s ‘The Missing Link’

NICOLE COLOMBO, What I think of Miranda, dedicated text, 2017

Survive, Adapt and Protect (Just Breath), 2017 & Survive, Adapt and Protect (You’ll Never be Missed), 2017

Shark. Meat. Demand. Increases, 2017

Shark. Meat. Demand. Increases, detail, 2017

 I’m Just Trying to be Pretty II (Racoon), 2017

 I’m Just Trying to be Pretty II (Racoon), 2017

all images from the exhibition Miranda by MONIA BEN HAMOUDA, Macelleria Antonio Miranda, Milan / March 2017

courtesy the artists and PANE PROJECT

Miranda is the title of the solo exhibition of MONIA BEN HAMOUDA which is taking place into a butcher’s shop of the same name in the centre of Milan.

This exhibition is part of PANE Project, a project run by Milan-based LUCIA LEUCI. PANE Project always took place so far in places where our basic needs such as eating or drinking can be somehow fulfilled.

Miranda by MONIA BEN HAMOUDA is on view at Macelleria Antonio Miranda in Milan until the 21st March 2017.

David Hanes. wfw aware #43

Aware: Hitzefrei (2017), MICHAEL SAILSTORFER
presented at König Galerie, Berlin
shot on March 7, 2017, altered on March 17, 2017 by DAVID HANES*
image courtesy of the artist and we find wildness

*DAVID HANES lives and works in Berlin. He is represented by Birch Contemporary, Toronto.

➝ read more about this special project for we find wildness here.

wfw weekend #389

Ripe Days of Silence (2017), MEGAN ROONEY
seen at Freymond-Guth Fine Arts, Basel
on Saturday, March 18, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #388

outside view into Honeybaked, JAN KIEFER
seen at Salts, Birsfelden/Basel
on Monday, March 13, 2017
image © we find wildness

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The Edmund Felson Gallery can be found in Berlin on Auguststr. 19/67 from March 1st – June 31st Opening hours Thursday 5 – 7pm, Saturday 3 – 5 pm

Look, all this is fraud at Milieu, Bern

Look, all this fraud with VICTORIA ADAM, MARLEN KELLER, JAN KIEFER, DOMINIC MICHEL, ADRIEN MISSIKA, YVES SCHERER, PHILIPP SIMON, PEDRO WIRZ
exhibition view at Milieu, Bern, February – March

all images courtesy of the artists, Milieu and VALENTINA SUTER

 

In law, fraud is deliberate deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain, or to deprive a victim of a legal right. Fraud itself can be a civil wrong (i.e., a fraud victim may sue the fraud perpetrator to avoid the fraud and/or recover monetary compensation), a criminal wrong (i.e., a fraud perpetrator may be prosecuted and imprisoned by governmental authorities) or it may cause no loss of money, property or legal right but still be an element of another civil or criminal wrong. The purpose of fraud may be monetary gain or other benefits, such as obtaining a driver’s license or qualifying for a mortgage by way of false statements.

A hoax is a distinct concept that involves deliberate deception without the intention of gain or of materially damaging or depriving a victim.*

Look, all this fraud with VICTORIA ADAM, MARLEN KELLER, JAN KIEFER, DOMINIC MICHEL, ADRIEN MISSIKA, YVES SCHERER, PHILIPP SIMON, PEDRO WIRZ was on view at Milieu in Bern from February 12 to March 12, 2017

*wikipedia

Eric Troncy. Very Entertaining

screen capture from http://purple.fr/magazine/ss-2017-issue-27/eric-troncy-2/ on March 16, 2107

image © we find wildness

While waiting for the pope of entertaining art, make sure to stay entertained by reading the whole text entitled Very Entertaining by ERIC TRONCY via http://purple.fr/magazine/ss-2017-issue-27/eric-troncy-2/

one pic tuesday. David Diao

Best Western2016
acrylic and vinyl on canvas, 48 x 32 inches

image courtesy of Postmasters, New York

I usually only post images from exhibitions that have not run their course, so you have the possibility to visit them in person before it closes. Nevertheless today’s pic is featuring a work by DAVID DIAO that were on view through a few days at Postmasters in New York. The text below was part of the press release provided by the gallery.

Events surrounding the loss of my home in China due to the Communist takeover has festered in my mind my entire life. Beginning in 2007, I finally painted some 30 works that zeroed in on this obsession. The resulting show was entitled, “I lived there until I was 6…” and consisted of paintings of maps, site and floor plans, deeds and other material evidence that the house actually existed. All photographs were lost. It was a harrowing escape from Chengdu to HongKong in late October 1949.

The present show continues the story but focuses on the 5 odd years before emigrating from HongKong to the US in 1955. One memory is of my neighbor Li Lihua, the famous movie star, and her glamorous life downstairs in contrast to our refugee drabness. Maps to establish locale and emblems of institutions in my life became paintings. The internet is a wondrous source for images that supplant the lack of a private archive. But in the end what is a child’s world but home, school, church. In working on these paintings I realize that during the entire period there I was mostly waiting to grow up. Besides America was beckoning. – DAVID DIAO, JANUARY 10, 2017

Hongkong Boyhood was on view at Postmasters in New York from February 4 to March 11, 2017.

David Hammons is on our mind.

WFW COMIX #8

wfw comix, March 2016
all images © JEREMY PININGRE and We Find Wildness

click on the arrows or the dots to navigate the gallery

WFW Comix is a project started in the beginning of 2016 with French artist JEREMY PININGRE. This is the 8th episode and if you have missed the previous issues, follow this link. If you want to know more about this special commission, it’s here.

wfw weekend #387

wall: PAUL THEK, floor: JASON DODGE
seen at Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin
on Saturday, March 4, 2017
image © we find wildness

wfw weekend #386

detail from In The Museum Trilogy Inventory (2017), MATHIS GASSER
seen at Kunsthaus Glarus
on Saturday, March 11, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Arriving for the opening of ERIC WESLEY’s survey-scale exhibition at the Los Angeles gallery 356 S. Mission Rd. in January 2015, visitors encountered a new Nissan parked at a rakish angle in the back lot, with its front doors ajar and music blaring from its speakers. That this was an artwork would surely never have occurred to many of those in attendance had it not been for the checklist, where it was designated Infinity Project (Black), 2015, with materials given as “clear lacquer paint on Infiniti.” (…) As a found object that was in fact rented, the vehicle could also be seen as a monument to transience and ephemerality. After the close of the show, one had to imagine the automobile undergoing a further turn in this Duchampian game of contextual transposition, mingling inconspicuously with all the other non-art cars in the rental fleet upon return. Moreover, once replaced within its original context, WESLEY’s Infiniti can only be faced with steady depreciation, the fate of all uncollected cars. – JAN TUMLIR on ERIC WESLEY, Artforum February 2017

Violet Dennison. Transcend

Transcend, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Transcend, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Transcend (detail), 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Ones, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Ones, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Soft Target, 2016
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Pipe Re-Route, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Pipe Re-Route, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Pipe Re-Route, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Pipe Re-Route, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

Pipe Re-Route, 2017
installation view at Jan Kaps, Cologne, January – April 2017

all images courtesy of the artist and Jan Kaps, Cologne

VIOLET DENNISON is currently presenting Transcend, a solo exhibition at the art venue Jan Kaps in Cologne, Germany. The press release published below has been written by science fiction writer MARK VON SCHLEGELL. The text describes the inanimate elements in the exhibition from the bacteria’s point of view. The latter are left to themselves, without cultures and independent in the exhibition space thanks to a pipe which discharged the wastewater from the washbasin in the exhibition space.

Escape for the artist is no longer according to posthuman human fantasy. In January 2017, WALT WHITMAN’s “little wash’d up drift” has found itself real, that is to say grown up, longhaired, flagrant, and principled female: the duringhuman. Consider today’s seagrass, whose duringhumanism was defined by sewage and whose death placed it on currents that floated it to Massachusetts. In death, duringhumanism awards it its own illusions, now offering this very POV pinned as if on a raft to the wall of a gallery in Cologne, Germany, somewhere up a lazy river.

For the duration of the exhibition (perhaps to this exquisite corpse relative to the length of a single human day) it dreams itself art. The ever drier weeks relieved only by the spectacle, from moment to moment, of water spilling out on the floor. In its very existence as “dead,” we perceive the seagrass shed more and more body. Death in a continual process. Will the grass one day float again when the river awakes and the valley floods? Will it green? Enjoying a life potentially greater than our own, containing within it a POV equally as ironic, this creature remains recognizably wild, or extra-human (as we expect more complete, more delicate and discover refined and particular) and alive exactly as it’s dead.

By most accounts, plumbing began human civilization. Can we wash our hands of the drains? We impalpable breezes, breaths, bacteria, still find ourselves duringhuman. We have these humans on our back, inextinct and limited. Sadly the sort of apocalypse we now entertain is not a simple freakout one-time poisoning as envisioned in the cold war. Now, as the engine piece perhaps of extinction, of the larger puzzle of all life as one brief expansion of the infinite into the infinite, we must occupy deterioration in such a fashion as to slow down our demise. Will we even get off planet? Before we can escape, we must first find ourselves. It bears remembering that homo sapiens existed in presumable tranquility for some one hundred seventy-seven thousand years before the mere seven thousand of the duringhuman began.

I myself arrived on a beach in Massachusetts from far away. A veteran of nearby New Bedford, a breather of the secret Salem that touches the sea, it was an easy transition on this impalpable breeze, and also up a foreign stream. I take and return the breath as it’s formulated in Klossowski’s The Baphomet (1965) as something that divides, but only infinitely and without principle. The sort of divide into dualities of Hegelianism and beyond is thought by me to be nuts. I dwell below, within, above the hum of human fantasy, at the high bacteriological. Updown here there may be a point to existence even now then. This expansive evershrinking expresses the generosity of decay belonging properly to Earth, my planet.

Hive all around me now, duringhumans. Rub and rub. You’ll never wash your hands of the pubic chaff, straw, splinters of wood, weeds, and the sea-gluten, scum, cum, scales from shining rocks. Species hierarchy is now clear. We bacteria alone can ride water from the husk. We must instantaneously befuddle the opportunistic humanisms still relying upon walls. – MARK VON SCHLEGELL, 2017.

Transcend by VIOLET DENNISON is on view at Jan Kaps, Cologne until April 8, 2017.