The Peshmerga offensive is a massive engineering enterprise, a monumental Land art operation. Behind each platoon there is a bulldozer waiting. Every hundred meters of gained territory results in hundreds of tons of dry earth pushed forward, all in order to move the front line ever closer to the suburbs of Mosul. Landscape is refashioned daily by the shelling, ISIS’s tunnels are behind, under, and beyond our mobile front line; the dunes are scarred by the infinite lines of trenches while on the Syrian-Iraqi border ISIS’s bulldozers breach a passage through a hill to erase the Sykes–Picot Agreement’s fatal design. The desert is no longer an exotic escape. It’s pure naked exposure. The closest to protection from the snipers is by running from one shadow to another. – Francis Alÿs on his embedment with the Kurdish Army in Mosul, Artforum, February 9, 2017

wfw weekend #381

spread from Inflight (2000), JOHAN GRIMONPREZ
browsed on Saturday, February 11, 2017
image © JOHANN GRIMONPREZ

please note that the whole publication is available online via http://www.johangrimonprez.be/PDF/BOOKS/2000_Inflight_JohanGrimonprez.pdf

wfw weekend #380

Fia (2016), SADIE BENNING
seen at Kunsthalle Basel
on Saturday, February 11, 2017
image © we find wildness

➝ follow we find wildness on instagram for instant content

one pic wednesday. Nairy Baghramian

YSL / New Waves (2001)
c-print, 90 × 75 cm

image courtesy of the artist

JÖRG HEISER: In the 1990s, there was much talk of utilizing the political potential of identity for artistic production.

NAIRY BAGHRAMIAN: At that time, as a migrant with an Iranian-Armenian background, I was expected to transform the stigma associated with my status into something positive.

JÖRG HEISER: Later you made the photographic diptych New Waves (Am Kaspischen Meer) (On the Caspian Sea, 2003) where you play with this idea: you’re beside the Caspian Sea in Iran and you’re wearing a balaclava, with an Yves Saint Laurent tie whose label is revealed by a gust of wind.

NAIRY BAGHRAMIAN: That was a response to the way one is both stigmatized and how one uses oneself. – excerpt from Room to Live, interview by JÖRG HEISER, Frieze, no. 131 (May 2010)

found via http://www.documenta14.de/en/south/906_ysl_new_waves

one message interview #38. KubaParis

image © we find wildness

click on the phone to read the whole message

KubaParis is a magazine, a printed one I mean, published twice a year since 2014. KubaParis is AMELIE GR. DARRELMANN & SASKIA HOHENGARTEN. Of course, KubaParis is also online:

http://kubaparis.com

read the previous one message interviews here

Roy Da Prince at Futura, Prague

VIKTOR TIMOFEEV, As Below So Above, 2016
digital prints on PVC

VIKTOR TIMOFEEV, As Below So Above, 2016
digital prints on PVC

IRINA LOTAREVICH, Untitled, 2016
steel knife pattern plates

AGNIESZKA GRODZINSKA, Untitled (from the series Foreshadow Fences), 2013
3 metal objects painted black

KERNEL, Torrent, 2016
discarded plastic cable jackets, lever straps, electrical tape

IRINA LOTAREVICH, St.Gallen Confessional, 2016
wood, stain, leather, thread, copper wire

SHANTA RAO, Untitled (2015-2016)
mixed media on steel

PEDRO WIRZ, An Egg For An Eye, 2016
balloons, fabric, latex, soil

PEDRO WIRZ, An Egg For An Eye (detail), 2016
balloons, fabric, latex, soil

QUENTIN EUVERTE, installation view

QUENTIN EUVERTE, Pink Paradise Never Dies, 2016
aluminium box, lithium grease, glass, electric and electronic system, mixed media

AGNIESZKA GRODZINSKA, Hard Light in the Light Heat series, 2013-2016
xerographic and print on paper

all images courtesy of the artists and Futura, Prague

Roy Da Prince is a group exhibition that explores the themes of confinement, regimentation, and oppression through sculptures, videos and installations. This show is named after a 24-year-old rapper also known as ROY DA PRINCE who was sentenced last year to 100 years of prison term in connection to a double shooting in 2014.

The exhibition takes place in the basement of the art centre Futura— located in a former industry building in Prague’s Smíchov district — imbuing the show with a temporal and spatial confinement. Indeed the space is a labyrinth-like cellar, where narrow passages are connected with minimal metal stairs to different rooms recalling cells.

This specific context implicates physical processes of vision and movement, creating an environment that feels like both prison and stage. While the general impression of the exhibition is a bleak, rather hopeless outlook, the works themselves thanks to their elaborated craftsmanship and restrained sense of colour offer a quiet yet visceral power to this claustrophobic atmosphere.

Roy Da Prince with QUENTIN EUVERTE, AGNIESZKA GRODZINSKA, KERNEL, IRINA LOTAREVICH, LUCIA ELENA PRUSA, SHANTA RAO, VIKTOR TIMOFEEV, ANDREW NORMAN WILSON and PEDRO WIRZ is on view at Futura, Prague until February 19, 2017.

The distrust of abstractions (…) finds expression in a widespread reduction of cultural ideas and activities to psychobiography. We are invited to see the ‘inner life’ of individuals as the most authentic level of reality.- Mark Fisher, Real Abstractions / The application of theory to the modern world, for Frieze Magazine, January 16, 2017

Domenico de Chirico for We Find Wildness #80

all images courtesy of the artist and Drei, Cologne

Schmierige Nebel, a solo exhibition by CEDRIC EISENRING
on view at Drei in Cologne
until February 18, 2017

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

wfw weekend #379

Motif (2015), DELPHINE REIST
seen at Centre Pasquart, Biel
on Wednesday, February 1, 2017
image © we find wildness

➝ follow we find wildness on instagram for instant content

– 

wfw weekend #378

installation view from Demo, PHYLLIDA BARLOW
seen at Kunsthalle Zürich
on Friday, February 3, 2017
image © we find wildness

see also: wfw weekend #357

follow we find wildness on instagram for instant content

Readymade at House Eva Presenhuber, Vnà

front: Grand Prix Viewing Place, 1994, LIAM GILLICK
back: Doctrine of Total War, 2016, LUTZ BACHER
wall left: Things to See and Do (Millenium Bridge), 2017, GILI TAL
wall right: Readymades Belong To Everyone®, 1951 – 1995, PHILIPPE THOMAS
floor: Galerie Eva Presenburger, 2017, MATHIEU MALOUF

wall left: Things to See and Do (Millenium Bridge), 2017, GILI TAL
floor left: Entrance Mat, 2016, GILI TAL (in collaboration with GEORGIE NETELL)
floor right: Galerie Eva Presenburger, 2017, MATHIEU MALOUF
wall back: Untitled (Trashcan), 2011, KLARA LIDÉN

malewithcorporateoppression3, 2013, GEORGIE NETTELL


back: Box Sculpture #2, 2012, MATIAS FALDBAKKEN
floor right: Rivat Lampe Des Kunstlers II, 1989, FRANZ WEST
table: Betrayal of the Mediocre, 2016, MERLIN CARPENTER 


wall left: Le Snobisme, 2008, VALENTIN CARRON
wall (screen): Kate Moss, 1996, KAREN KILIMNIK

all images: Courtesy Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich
photography: MARC ASEKHAME

 

Readymade is an exhibition which brings together LUTZ BACHER, TIMOTHÉE CALAME, MERLIN CARPENTER, VALENTIN CARRON, MATIAS FALDBAKKEN, SYLVIE FLEURY, LIAM GILLICK, KOO JEONG A, PIERRE JOSEPH, KAREN KILIMNIK, ADRIANA LARA, KLARA LIDÉN, MATHIEU MALOUF, GEORGIE NETTEL, OLIVER PAYNE, READYMADES BELONG TO EVERYONE ®, GILI TAL, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS and HEIMO ZOBERNIG.

The exhibition curated by FREDI FISCHLI and NIELS OLSEN is presented into the house of Eva Presenhuber in Vnà, Switzerland until March 25, 2017.

If there is a cat in the house, I want to believe its name is Readymade.

Gregor Schneider: Wall Before Wall is on view at Bundeskunsthalle Bonn until February 19, 2017

Hanne Darboven & Charlotte Posenenske at Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin

HANNE DARBOVEN and CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE
exhibition view at Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin, 2017
behind: HANNE DARBOVEN, Wunschkonzert, 1984
front: CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE, Vierkantrohre Serie DW, 1967
image courtesy of the artists and Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin

HANNE DARBOVEN and CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE
exhibition view at Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin, 2017
image courtesy of the artists and Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin

HANNE DARBOVEN and CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE
exhibition view at Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin, 2017
image courtesy of the artists and Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin

HANNE DARBOVEN, Wunschkonzert, 1984
image courtesy of the artists and Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin

HANNE DARBOVEN and CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE
exhibition view at Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin, 2017
behind: HANNE DARBOVEN, Wunschkonzert, 1984
front: CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE, Vierkantrohre Serie DW, 1967
image courtesy of the artists and Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin

HANNE DARBOVEN and CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE
exhibition view at Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin, 2017
behind: HANNE DARBOVEN, Wunschkonzert, 1984
front: CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE, Vierkantrohre Serie DW, 1967
image courtesy of the artists and Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin

CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE, Vierkantrohre Serie DW, 1967
image courtesy of the artists and Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin

HANNE DARBOVEN and CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE
exhibition view at Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin, 2017
behind: HANNE DARBOVEN, Wunschkonzert, 1984
front: CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE, Vierkantrohre Serie DW, 1967
image courtesy of the artists and Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin

The images above are actually showing a reenactment of an exhibition that took place in 1967 at the Konrad Fischer Galerie located at that period in Düsseldorf. The show in the sixties presented the work of CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE (1930-1985) with four modules from the series Vierkantrohre Serie and DW (1967) as well as the 120 drawings Konstruktionen (1966-1967) by HANNE DARBOVEN (1941-2009).

Fifty years later the pieces are not exactly the same as they were. Nor the location. The walls are still occupied with DARBOVEN‘s work but this time with the major composition entitled Wunschkonzert Opus 17A und B, Opus 18A und B (1984) as well as the work 42/100 Ein Jahrhundert ABC (2002).

Wunschkonzert (1984) is divided into four parts: Opus 17A and B, and Opus 18 A and B. Each opus is comprised of 36 poems, structured vertically in rows of 7. Every poem comprises of six pages including a title page on which a greeting card (for the occasion of a Christian confirmation) has been collaged. Eventually the work consists of 1009 pages of uniform size. The title refers to the Sunday afternoon musical request programme of the Norddeutscher Rundfunk radio station where felicitations are transmitted also.

“The work 42/100 Ein Jahrhundert ABC (2002), comprising 72 panels, is arranged in three parts. According to her own notation and calculation system which she developed in the late 60s, HANNE DARBOVEN uses various graphical representations to depict the timespan of the 20th century”. *

As for the Vierkantrohre Serie (1967) as well as the DW (1968) by POSENENSKE, this body of work has been conceived with the idea that the curators or buyers can arbitrarily assemble and change the installation. The number of unit parts incorporated in each iteration of the work is not defined, meaning that they can be fashioned to fit a space, or continued indefinitely.

I make series
because I do not want to make individual pieces for individuals,
in order to have elements combinable within a system,
in order to make something that is repeatable, objective,
and because it is economical.
The series can be prototypes for mass-production.

They are less and less recognisable as ‘works of art.’
The objects are intended to represent anything other than what they are.

– CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE, ‘Statement’, Art International, no.5, May 1968, p.50

Someone has to reenact this exhibition in 2067.  Meanwhile HANNE DARBOVEN CHARLOTTE POSENENSKE is on view at Konrad Fischer Galerie in Berlin until February 25, 2017.

*press release

one pic tuesday. Nicole Wermers

Moodboard #7, 2017
cast terrazzo in baby changing unit, 21 x 34 x 21 in / 53.3 x 86.4 x 53.3 cm

image courtesy of the artist and Jessica Silverman Gallery

Today’s pic shows a work by NICOLE WERMERS that is currently on view in her solo exhibition Grundstück.

Entitled Mood Boards (2016-2017) the work consists of a series of wall-hung baby-changing stations filled with different types of terrazzo.

Terrazzo is an affordable imitation of marble which was developed in Venice over 500 years ago. Just like the foldable baby stations, this type of flooring is often used in public buildings or apartment buildings among others. The combination of those both materials which are reminiscent of middle-class banality, seems to serve as a viscera in moving through questions of class, culture, and gender.

Grundstück by NICOLE WERMERS is on view at Jessica Silverman Gallery in San Francisco until February 18, 2017.

.

These photographs are primarily operative on the level of their content, which is less the subjects depicted or any psychology their bodies might convey but, rather, the gamut of technical tropes and possibilities within studio photography today. And it is through this seeming evacuation of conventional content via formal manipulation, that these shots shed light on our current relation to the world of images. – ILYA LIPKIN on the Photographic Real, 30 January 2017, Texte Zur Kunst