wfw weekend #119

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Figurines de Genève by HAYAN KAM NAKACHE
seen at Centre d’Art Contemporain in Geneva
on Tuesday, February 25, 2014
image © wfw

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K-Hole. Youth Mode

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from the report Youth Mode: A Report on Freedom by the New-York based trend-forecasting group K-HOLE and the Brazilian market research company Box 1824.

download this issue for free via http://khole.net/

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studio visit #3. Virginie Morillo

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VIRGINIE’s homemade cucumber cocktail

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VIRGINIE MORILLO
at her studio, Usine Kugler, Geneva
february 2014
images © wfw

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VIRGINIE MORILLO was born in Switzerland in 1982. She is an artist, designer, creative director and a DJ. VIRGINIE shares a studio with two other artists which lies in a former industrial complex at the West end of the city of Geneva in La Jonction district, a dynamic center that hosts a vibrant interdisciplinary community.

The studio is very spacious, clean and cozy. It feels like one big space even though it’s ‘divided’ in three sections. The shelves are filled with everyday objects, art pieces, books, memorabilia, and fabrics among others. While having her portrait taken for this studio visit, we start talking about her work in the worlds of art, music, cooking and fashion that are all bounded by a strong dedication for textures, materials and techniques. Talking with VIRGINIE is a brilliant web. As she speaks, she connects lines through her travels, residencies, tattoos, material experiments and encounters. VIRGINIE is like a cat, she seems to have several lives.

In the upcoming weeks, VIRGINIE MORILLO will leave Geneva for Mexico, open an online shop and have a few exhibitions, try to catch her online via www.virginiemorillo.com .

 

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wfw weekend #118

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Wallet (2014, turtle shell, woman/man and kid cotton underwear) by NINA BEIER
presented on the occasion of her solo exhibition Rocky
seen at Kunsthaus Glarus, Switzerland
on Sunday, February 9, 2014
image © wfw

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Guillaume Pilet. Learning to Love

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Learning to Love, 2013
16 silver gelatin prints

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Learning to Love, 2013
silver gelatin print

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Learning from Aping – The Mind Map, 2012-2014
installation, archive materials, books, objects, magazines

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Learning from Aping – The Mind Map, 2012-2014
installation, archive materials, books, objects, magazines

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Learning from Aping – The Mind Map, 2012-2014
installation, archive materials, books, objects, magazines

exhibition view at Kunsthaus Glarus, February 2014

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Learning from Aping – The Mind Map, 2012-2014
installation, archive materials, books, objects, magazines

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Learning from Aping – The Mind Map, 2012-2014
installation, archive materials, books, objects, magazines

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Learning from Aping – The Mind Map, 2012-2014
installation, archive materials, books, objects, magazines

exhibition view at Kunsthaus Glarus, February 2014

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Zoo Manners, 2014
ceramic, mirror, wood, pump

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Zoo Manners (detail) 2014
ceramic, mirror, wood, pump

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Zoo Manners (detail) 2014
ceramic, mirror, wood, pump

Cage Painting, 2014
acrylic on canvas, triptych

exhibition view at Kunsthaus Glarus, February 2014

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Surrogate Mother, 2014
diverse materials

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I Ape Therefore I Am (trailer), 2014

all images © wfw

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I often ask myself how I position myself as an artist, but there’s no way I could say. I ape art, I think, if not deliberately. I can’t seem to do anything else says Swiss artist GUILLAUME PILET. His works mixes primitivism, Pop, naive expression as well as contemporary criticism and flirts with the art history and the sciences. The artist’s first solo exhibition at Kunsthaus Glarus, Learning to Love, brought together a selection of mostly new works that focus on primates, a subject with which PILET has been preoccupied since 2011.

In the first gallery of the kunsthaus, a ceramic sculpture, which depicts a tea-drinking monkey perched on a mirrored pedestal, and a tryptich entitled Cage Paintings (2014) question the exhibition space by suggesting that the museum is like a zoo leaving the viewer to define whether he is inside or outside, in freedom or in captivity, animal or human.

Other works eloquently examine PILET‘s understanding of the relationship between man and animal as an allegory of human behavior. On the basement level, a vast installation entitled Learning from Aping – The Mind Map (2012-2014) compiles PILET‘s extensive documentation of books, magazines, videos and objects from everyday culture related to apes.

What I obviously found so fascinating about the image of the monkey is that it crops up in such different areas: in art history, as I mentioned earlier, in groundbreaking experiments in behavioural psychology, and in the entertainment sector in regressive shows like the TBS Chimp Channel show, where parodies are played by chimpanzees.

I’m not a scientist. My intuitive methods of assimilating these various allusions often have a metaphorical or allegorical character. I think that viewers who follow their own associations will pick up on the more serious questions behind these humorous-looking forms. Their a priori playful appearance might even make the effect of these works even more brutal. - GUILLAUME PILET in conversation with TIPHANIE BLANC and YANN CHATEIGNET

The upper gallery features an installation consisting of various scenes from his experimental film I Ape Therefore I Am as well as two sculptures including Surrogate Mother (2014), a figure that HARRY HARLOW, an American psychologist and behavioral researcher, repeatedly used as a safe haven for ape babies*. GUILLAUME PILET closed the show by demonstrating that art is not dissimilar to his fetishism which oscillates between animal and man, nature and culture, wildness and domestication, freedom and captivity, love and domination.

Good news: Learning to Love is currently on view at Kunsthaus Glarus until May 4, 2014.  If you are interested about the primate project  by GUILLAUME PILET, I really suggest you to follow http://learning-from-aping.tumblr.com/

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*In HARLOW’s experiments, ape babies were confronted with this frightening insect, allowing him to study how they deal with the unknown and fear. With the surrogate mother’s repeated reassurance and encouragement, the ape baby successfully mastered its confrontation with the unknown

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Philip-Lorca diCorcia. Hustlers

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excerpt from the photobook review by JÖRG M. COLBERG about the book Philip-Lorca di Corcia, Hustlers published by Steidl in August 2013.

➝ read the entire review http://cphmag.com/hustlers/

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find via 

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Talia Chetrit

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Self-portrait (Pool), 1995/2013
silver gelatin print

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Self-portrait (13), 1995/2013
silver gelatin print

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Mom (Ocean), 2013
digital C-print

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Mom (Window Reflection), 2013
digital C-print

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Self-portrait (Profile), 2013
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Untitled 2013, digital C-print

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Imprint (from ‘Hand on Body’) 2012
silver gelatin print

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Untitled (Turn #1) 2012, digital C-print
Untitled (Turn #2) 2012, digital C-print

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Nipples, 2012, digital C-print
Hair, 2012, silver gelatin print
Nipple/Chain, 2012, silver gelatin print

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Mud, 2011
silver gelatin print

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Vagina/Vase Imprint, 2011
silver gelatin print

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Vagina/Vase, 2011
silver gelatin print

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Back/Grid, 2011, silver gelatin print
Drip Vases, 2011, silver gelatin print

all images courtesy of the artist (unless otherwise stated)

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TALIA CHETRIT (usa, born in 1982) has created a body of work that questions photography and the ways that viewers perceive and understand it. She aims to achieve that goal not by manipulating photographs, but rather by isolating and decontextualizing what’s in front of her lens, and thus by transforming reality into a work of fiction.

The pictures are always a mystery to me until I develop the film and see what has been recorded. This “standard” was created from thinking about photography as a manipulation that is often disguised as a reproduction. This opposition is what excites me about photography—a permanent record of something that never existed. – TALIA CHETRIT in conversation with LUCAS BLALOCK, March 2010

More recently CHETRIT retrieved rolls of film she took of her family as a thirteen-year-old in the mid-1990s, re-cropping and re-editing these old images, and returning to photograph her family again. Those images are intimate portraits of her own family in and around their home and revisit a moment when taking pictures seemed to exist outside of any context of historical or professional knowledge.

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Good news: her work is currently part of the group exhibition  Morning and Evening Asylum at Tanya Leighton in Berlin as well as at Off Vendôme in Düsseldorf.

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Nicolas Provost. Papillon d’amour

Papillon d’amour, 3′30”, 2003
music: The Wrath of Köhn by Köhn AKA Jürgen De Blonde
producer: NICOLAS PROVOST
courtesy Tim Van Laere Gallery, Antwerp

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For Papillon d’amour (2003), NICOLAS PROVOST subjects a number of fragments
from Rashomon (1951), a film by AKIRA KUROSAWA a mirror effect thus creating
ethereal figures, constantly remelting into each other and slipping away again.
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I like to sculpt with existing or prefabricated audiovisual material and turn it into
a new story, a new idea. A great quality of classic Hollywood imagery is that it
forms an important part of the collective memory. Actually, the fact that
I started working with found footage also has to do with technological
developments. Around the turn of the millennium, the digital revolution made it
possible to upload films on your computer or laptop and easily re-edit them yourself,
just at home. So I started sculpting existing material almost by accident.
- NICOLAS PROVOST in conversation with IVE STEVENHEYDENS, June 2013

Over the past decade, artist and filmmaker Nicolas Provost has carefully shaped a body of work that explores the quirks of human expectation by playing with images from film, literature, and popular culture that are ingrained in our collective memory. His works are in a number of collections, including The New Art Gallery Walsall and Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, Musée d’art moderne et contemporain de Strasbourg, SMAK Ghent and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium. His work has earned a long list of awards and screenings at prestigious festivals including The Sundance Film Festival, The Venice Film Festival, The Berlinale, The San Sebastian Film Festival and The Locarno Film Festival. His critically acclaimed feature film ‘The Invader’ had it’s world premiere in competition at the Venice Film Festival 2011. He recently completed the ‘Plot Point’ trilogy, 3 fiction films he shot with a hidden camera in New York, Las Vegas and Tokyo.

Good news: his fourth solo exhibition at Tim Van Laere Gallery in Antwerp is currently on view until March 15, 2014

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wfw weekend #117

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detail from Learning to Love (2013, silver gelatin print)
by Swiss artist GUILLAUME PILET
seen at the Kunsthaus Glarus
on Sunday, February 9, 2014
image © wfw

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GUILLAUME PILET’s solo exhibition Learning to Love is on view at Kunsthaus Glarus until May 4, 2014

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Rita Ponce de León

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Youniverse, 109 x 69 cm, 2013

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David, exhibition view at Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros, México,  2012-2013

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Acepto que nada es mio (I accept that nothing is mine), 2010-2012, 120 ink drawings on paper

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A Change Of Mind Serves To Advance An Honest Mind Drawings (I Started Saying Something But I Forgot And Said Something Else) (Dibujos de Cambio de Idea-Comencé diciendo algo pero lo olvidé y dije otra cosa-), 2014
11 drawings (ink, pencil, colored pencil) on paper, framed
various dimensions

all works courtesy the artist and Galeria 80 metros cuadrados, Lima, PE.
Kunsthalle Basel 2014, photo: SERGE HASENBÖHLER

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all images / drawings courtesy the artist (unless otherwise stated)

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The  31-year old Mexico resident creates large wall compositions as well as small drawings, both precise and subtil, conceptual and metaphorical.  RITA PONCE DE LEÓN develops her work mostly by talking to people, and recording these conversations through the medium of drawing as if they were reports or notesWhat’s interesting lies not only in the discussions and meanings but also in the question of how they are represented.

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Good news: RITA PONCE DE LEÓN is currently presenting her first solo exhibition in Europe at Kunsthalle Basel for which she worked with Mexican architect PABLO PÉREZ PALACIOS to develop an exhibition concept that extends to architectural transformations of space as well as drawings.

➝ Endless openness produces circles is on view at Kunsthalle Basel until March 30, 2014

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Isa Genzken

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Ohr (Ear), 1980
Chromogenic color print, 69 x 46 1/2” (175.3 x 118.1 cm)
Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of Mary and Earle Ludgin by exchange, courtesy the artist and Galerie Buchholz, Cologne/Berlin © ISA GENZKEN

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This photograph by German artist ISA GENZKEN entitled Ohr (Ear) (1980) is from a series of photographs that she made in 1980 in New York asking women on the street if she could photograph their ear. Around this time, GENZKEN also made a group of works by photographing and enlarging advertisements for stereo systems from American, French, German, and Japanese magazines. She has often installed her photographs of hi-fi stereo equipment, in juxtaposition with her ear photographs and her Hyperbolo and Ellipsoid sculptures, likening the engineering of a state-of-the-art stereo system both to the intricate shape of the human ear and to the precision modeling of her sculptures.

I think that photography has a lot to do with sculpture – because it is three-dimensional and because it depicts reality. For example, I have always been able to relate to photography more than to painting. When I was photographing the hi-fi adverts I thought to myself, everyone has one of these towers at home. It’s the latest thing, the most modern equipment available. So a sculpture must be at least as modern and must stand up to it. Then I hung the pictures on the wall and put an ellipsoid  on the floor and thought, the ellipsoid must be at least as good as this advert. At least as good. That’s how good a modern sculpture has to be. Do you see what I mean? That was the dialogue… - ISA GENZKEN in conversation with WOLFGANG TILLMANS, Camera Austria 2003

Good news: the first comprehensive retrospective of GENZKEN‘s work in an American museum, is currently on view at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

 

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