Domenico de Chirico for We Find Wildness #84

all images:
Courtesy Massimo de Carlo, Milan / London / Hong Kong
photo: ALESSANDRO ZAMBIANCHI

Sincerely, Tony, a solo exhibition by JAMIAN JULIANO-VILLANI
on view at Massimo de Carlo, Milan
until April 29, 2017

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO

wfw weekend #395

all: Beggar (2017), ANDREA BÜTTNER
seen at Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen
on Sunday, April 9, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #394

Untitled (Cartoon Painting) (detail), 2017, STEFAN BRÜGGEMANN
seen at Hauser & Wirth, Zürich
on Saturday, April 8, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Paul Chan. Rhi Anima

Pentasophia (or Le bonheur de vivre dans la catastrophe du monde occidental), 2016
nylon, metal, concrete, shoes, fans, various papers, 151 x 130 x 98 inches (383.5 x 330.2 x 248.9 cm)

Pentasophia (or Le bonheur de vivre dans la catastrophe du monde occidental), 2016
nylon, metal, concrete, shoes, fans, various papers, 151 x 130 x 98 inches (383.5 x 330.2 x 248.9 cm)

Pentasophia (or Le bonheur de vivre dans la catastrophe du monde occidental), 2016
nylon, metal, concrete, shoes, fans, various papers, 151 x 130 x 98 inches (383.5 x 330.2 x 248.9 cm)

Pentasophia (or Le bonheur de vivre dans la catastrophe du monde occidental), 2016
nylon, metal, concrete, shoes, fans, various papers, 151 x 130 x 98 inches (383.5 x 330.2 x 248.9 cm)

Le Baigneur 1, 2016
nylon, fan, concrete shoes, specially made cords, 52 x 30 x 26 inches (132.1 x 76.2 x 66 cm)

Le Baigneur 1, 2016
nylon, fan, concrete shoes, specially made cords, 52 x 30 x 26 inches (132.1 x 76.2 x 66 cm)

Dimposium, 2016
nylon, fans, fabric, rug, 93 x 77 x 44 inches (236.2 x 195.6 x 111.8 cm)

Dimposium, 2016
nylon, fans, fabric, rug, 93 x 77 x 44 inches (236.2 x 195.6 x 111.8 cm)

Pillowsophia (after Ghostface), 2016
nylon, wood, concrete, shoes, fans, 228 x 216 x 96 inches (579.1 x 548.6 x 243.8 cm)

Pillowsophia (after Ghostface) (detail), 2016
nylon, wood, concrete, shoes, fans, 228 x 216 x 96 inches (579.1 x 548.6 x 243.8 cm)

Baigneurs Sans Rien, 2017
nylon, fans, fabric floor piece, 71 x 120 x 70 inches (180.3 x 304.8 x 177.8 cm)

Baigneurs Sans Rien, 2017
nylon, fans, fabric floor piece, 71 x 120 x 70 inches (180.3 x 304.8 x 177.8 cm)

Madonna With Childs, 2016
nylon, fans, 101 x 100 x 69 inches (256.5 x 254 x 175.3 cm)

all images courtesy of the artist and Greene Naftali, New York

Rhi Anima features a new body of work PAUL CHAN calls breathers. The breathers are both sculptural works and moving images. Each breather is composed of a fabric “body” designed by CHAN and attached to one or more specially modified fans. Incorporating techniques that combine fashion design, patternmaking, drawing, and physics, CHAN manipulates how the breathers move by composing the internal architecture of the bodies so that they are capable of exploiting the airflow and air pressure from the fans to create different kinds of “motion.” Simply by how they are shaped and sewn, the breathers can be animated and choreographed in ways unlike anything CHAN has created so far. *

Rhi Anima is on view at Greene Naftali, New York until April 15, 2017.

*excerpt from the press release

 

JUDITH HOPF, Up ! (2016) 1 min 58 sec http://www.contemporaryartdaily.com/2017/04/judith-hopf-at-deborah-schamoni-2/ (wrongly defined as More (2015))

Ben Schumacher at Kunstverein Braunschweig

Käsesakramentsystem, 2017
Installation view Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2016,
Courtesy of the artist, photo: STEFAN STARK

Käsesakramentsystem, 2017
Installation view Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2016,
Courtesy of the artist, photo: STEFAN STARK

Käsesakramentsystem, 2017
Installation view Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2016,
Courtesy of the artist, photo: STEFAN STARK

Käsesakramentsystem, 2017
Installation view Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2016,
Courtesy of the artist, photo: STEFAN STARK

Käsesakramentsystem, 2017
Installation view Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2016,
Courtesy of the artist, photo: STEFAN STARK

Käsesakramentsystem, 2017
Installation view Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2016,
Courtesy of the artist, photo: STEFAN STARK

Käsesakramentsystem, 2017
Installation view Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2016,
Courtesy of the artist, photo: STEFAN STARK

Käsesakramentsystem, 2017
Installation view Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2016,
Courtesy of the artist, photo: STEFAN STARK

Käsesakramentsystem, 2017
Installation view Kunstverein Braunschweig, 2016,
Courtesy of the artist, photo: STEFAN STARK

For his first institutional presentation, BEN SCHUMACHER has turned the exhibition space of the Kunstverein Braunschweig into a cheese storage. The installation consists of 32 wheels of cheese placed onto a shelving system as well as seven carved wooden objects that look like cut wheels of cheese. The installation is complemented by a seven-part series of new paintings by SCHUMACHER.

The exhibition is accompanied by a text written by JONATHAN GEAN which has the taste of a sermon under fermentation. Here is a short excerpt:

Could Cheesus be here in Braunschweig now, already among us? How can we recognize the form of a thing which must in certain respects be entirely unlike all others which have come before? Thankfully, the fruitful work of certain theologians provides us with the clues by which we might make an accurate identification. Candidate cheeses would be capable of self-consideration at greater depth than is common, through which they may recognize their own substance as metaphorically pregnant and widely analogously applicable. This scenario therefore provides useful images by which we might symbolically divine the potential nature of the spiritual becoming of the self-revelation, were it to take place here, through which Cheesus would come to recognize its own divinity, suspended between the nebulous chaos of whey and the singular radiance of the curd. The thought of Cheesus would contain the world, expressed here as a tensed glance linking the rigidity of structure to a heady formlessness

Käsesakramentsystem by BEN SCHUMACHER is on display until May 14, 2017

one pic tuesday. Peter Fraser

Cheddar No 5 (detail), from the series Everyday Icons, 1986
© PETER FRASER; courtesy Camilla Grimaldi Gallery

This is a photograph I made inside a school on a Sunday, totally deserted. What I loved about this picture was the difference between these two blue buckets which initially appear to be the same but the closer you go in, the more you realize these two blue buckets are very different.

This points the finger at what’s so important for me about moving around in the world and coming across situations that I have never ever seen before. It’s in that moment that a certain kind of intensity, a flash of recognition of the importance of what is standing in front of me takes place. It has everything to do with the fact that I have never seen that scene before. PETER FRASER, January 2013

Two Blue Buckets (Directors Cut) by PETER FRASER has been very recently (re)-published by Peperoni books.

I find it interesting, how that works. How the original and the copy, the hierarchies, and the authorities who are meant to deliver “the originals” are dependent upon the people they aim to exclude. And maybe that process has been sped up through social media and these feedback loops of exclusivity. Those feedback loops are as valid as the “real deal.” It’s also the real deal. If it exists on its own it’s no longer a copy. – ANNA UDDENBERG, Cura Magazine #24, April 2017

wfw weekend #393

Red wine Spider-man Château Neuf (2016), PHILIPPE DAERENDINGER
seen at Quark, Geneva
on Friday, March 31, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #392

Supplements Models Prototypes, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS
seen at gta exhibitions, Zürich
on Thursday, March 30, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Antoine Renard & Libby Rothfeld. 1999

1999, ANTOINE RENARD & LIBBY ROTHFELD
exhibition view at Marsèlleria, Milan, 2017

ANTOINE RENARD, Floor Arrangement #3, 2017

ANTOINE RENARD, Floor Arrangement #3 (detail), 2017

LIBBY ROTHFELD, Eye of the Storm, 2017

1999, ANTOINE RENARD & LIBBY ROTHFELD
exhibition view at Marsèlleria, Milan, 2017

LIBBY ROTHFELD, Flyer, 2017

LIBBY ROTHFELD, How Come You Only Want Tomorrow With Its Promise of Something Hard to Do, 2017

1999, ANTOINE RENARD & LIBBY ROTHFELD
exhibition view at Marsèlleria, Milan, 2017

ANTOINE RENARD and LIBBY ROTHFELD, Interfaith Rack IX (large cross), 2017

ANTOINE RENARD, Floor Arrangement #2, 2017

ANTOINE RENARD, Untitled (DJI-0002), 2016

all images courtesy of the artists and Marsèlleria, Milan
photos: SARA SCANDEREBECH

While walking in a city, one of the best moment is when all the street lights go on like it would be the sign of a spectral presence. A few minutes before this almost unpredictable instant you are just trying simultaneously to walk and to adjust your eyes to the dusk which is flattening every details that could have made the place significant.

Those electric gaps into the public space triggered some unlikely comparisons with the exhibition currently presented at Marsèlleria in Milano.

In 2016, ANTOINE RENARD and LIBBY ROTHFELD were invited by SILIQOON to Bologna to make a work in response to the city and moreover to collaborate with local companies.

The result is an exhibition entitled 1999 which juxtaposes and mingles two works, revealing affinities and provoking unexpected associations while highlighting the individual perspective of each artist.

Nevertheless they both have created works that employ materials and methods from a built environment that seems to engender cryptic, hostile and mystical human activities in the space.

1999 with ANTOINE RENARD and LIBBY ROTHFELD is on view at Marsèlleria, Milano until April 14, 2017.

Irena Haiduk. Against Biography

screen capture from Against Biography (2015)IRENA HAIDUK
on March 28, 2017
image © we find wildness

IRENA HAIDUK is not only against biography but she is also part of the documenta 14 with a project entitled Nine Hour Delay.

Initiated in 2012, the work consists of the distribution of the ergonomic footwear to the workforce of the institution where the project is exhibited. The documenta press release stated that “all those, regardless of gender, who are seduced by the prospect of wearing ergonomic women’s footwear and are employed for documenta 14 are eligible to receive a pair of Borosana Shoes within the rubric of Nine Hour Delay”.

The Borosana shoe was first developed over a nine-year period (1960-69) at Borovo Rubber Industry Headquarters in Vukovar, Yugoslavia. After being designed and tested by the Borovo female workforce and an orthopedic surgeon, the shoe was mandatory for Yugoslav women working in the public sector. Borosana was launched in 1969, in white and navy colors, featuring an ergonomic platform, calculated as ideal for nine hours of standing without hurting the wearer’s spine. In the declining years of Yugoslav communism the model was withdrawn from mass production. Fabrication was abandoned when Vukovar became a war zone in 1991.
Each time this project is exhibited Borosana becomes the official work shoe of the host institution advancing the constructivist maxim of great utilitarian design in service of the working woman. The shoe extends the architecture of labor and provides the wearers with a distinction between labor time and leisure time. Borovo remains the last public Yugoslav infrastructure. The inability to legally split and privatize the company’s public assets prevents Yugoslavia from fully formally splitting to this day. With every new step Yugoslavia persists (insists). – http://yugoexport.com

On March 30, 2017 IRENA HAIDUK will recount the progress of the oral corporation Yugoexport at Parko Eleftherias, Athens Municipality Arts Center (5 pm).

The whole text Against Biography is available here http://yugoexport.com/sitefiles/2_AGAINST_BIOGRAPHY.pdf

 

 

wfw weekend #391

Infection (2017), PAMELA ROSENKRANZ
seen at Fondazione Prada, Milan
on Sunday, March 25, 2017
image © we find wildness

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wfw weekend #390

Structural Psychodrama #3 (2017), MONICA BONVICINI
seen at Galleria Raffaella Cortese, Milan
on Saturday, March 25, 2017
image © we find wildness

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Domenico de Chirico for We Find Wildness #83

all images courtesy of the artist and Société, Berlin

a solo exhibition by NED VENA
on view at Société, Berlin
until April 15, 2017

chosen by curator and editor DOMENICO DE CHIRICO