The author must give up on aping genius. Rather show the author as ape, the author as idiot. Don’t have the hubris of being the comedian. You are the straight man in this farce; the universe is the funny man. So don’t be silly, cute, crack jokes, or play coy, but allow hilarity, a cleansing painful laughter that splits your sides and your heart. Follow your own foolishness like tracks upon the sand. – Lars Iyer, Nude in your hot tub, facing the abyss (a literary manifesto after the end of literature and manifestos), The White Review , November 2011

Thomas Nagel. What is it like to be a bat?

Seth Price. Redistribution

After Kathy Acker, Chris Kraus, The MIT Press, July 2017 https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/after-kathy-acker

Louise Lawler. Prominence Given, Authority Taken

It’s interesting, for instance, how charcoal becomes trendy today in organic and well-being food, even if it’s been fucking up generations of miner’s lungs. Some use it as a natural way to ease stomach pain and bad digestion. I prefer its vomiting effects: it’s used as an emergency treatment for certain kinds of severe poisoning and OD’s. I like that it’s presented here in the shape of a large, family-size bread we could eat of all together, while expelling all the possible mad-driving toxins. The idea of letting go, of fluidity, of opening the valves, a joyful communal diarrhea prompted me to ask the baker how we could form a sort of orifice in the bread. He folded his arm and pushed his elbow far in the middle of the fresh dough. – The Future of Not Working, Aline Bouvy in conversation with Louise Osieka, June 5, 2017

The power of capital rests on that fiction of a present engendered by art; it is not least thanks to art that capital has become autonomous vis-à-vis politics and production. And the manifest product of this autonomy is the total aestheticization of life, politics, and (philosophical) thinking. It is in response to this aestheticization that we urgently need to consider (poetic) alternatives. – The Speculative End Of The Aesthetic Regime, Armen Avanessian, Texte Zur Kunst, Issue No. 93 / March 2014 „speculation“

Cady Noland

Seth Price. Wrong Seeing, Odd Thinking, Strange Action

wfw weekend #400

One form of resistance is to go dark, to stop making artwork that can in any way be represented on the platforms that facilitate these forms of recuperation. But even if you as an artist don’t post images of your work on social media, other people might. You could institute a Berghain rule and administer stickers over phone’s camera lenses upon entering an exhibition, but then, hashtags are indexable forms of language that don’t require images and are still a useful metric for brands. You could literally never show your work to anyone. You could embrace chaos and illegibility, creating visual or written work that is non-instrumentalizable, but legible across many parts over a longer period of time. This might mean making work that operates at a different tempo than that of branding and social media, work that occupies multiple sites and forms, work that fights for the complexity of identity (as artist or otherwise) and form, and believes in a creaturely capacity for patience with a maximum dedication to understanding. – Dena Yago, on Ketamine and Added Value, e-flux, May 2017

Laure Prouvost

Irena Haiduk. Against Biography

Eric Troncy. Very Entertaining

Arriving for the opening of ERIC WESLEY’s survey-scale exhibition at the Los Angeles gallery 356 S. Mission Rd. in January 2015, visitors encountered a new Nissan parked at a rakish angle in the back lot, with its front doors ajar and music blaring from its speakers. That this was an artwork would surely never have occurred to many of those in attendance had it not been for the checklist, where it was designated Infinity Project (Black), 2015, with materials given as “clear lacquer paint on Infiniti.” (…) As a found object that was in fact rented, the vehicle could also be seen as a monument to transience and ephemerality. After the close of the show, one had to imagine the automobile undergoing a further turn in this Duchampian game of contextual transposition, mingling inconspicuously with all the other non-art cars in the rental fleet upon return. Moreover, once replaced within its original context, WESLEY’s Infiniti can only be faced with steady depreciation, the fate of all uncollected cars. – JAN TUMLIR on ERIC WESLEY, Artforum February 2017