Saâdane Afif, The Fountain Archives, 2008 – ongoing, http://thefountainarchives.net

Lawrence Weiner, That was the trouble with Aristotle, 2010

If I can’t sleep at night is it because I am awake in someone else’s room?_ a final performance inside a hotel room _ Friday, July 28, 2017, 9 pm to 11 pm at Hotel Zoo Berlin

After Kathy Acker, Chris Kraus, The MIT Press, July 2017 https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/after-kathy-acker

DNA is an excellent medium for archiving data. Recent efforts have illustrated the potential for information storage in DNA using synthesized oligonucleotides assembled in vitro. A relatively unexplored avenue of information storage in DNA is the ability to write information into the genome of a living cell by the addition of nucleotides over time. (…) Here we use the CRISPR–Cas system to encode the pixel values of black and white images and a short movie into the genomes of a population of living bacteria. – CRISPR–Cas encoding of a digital movie into the genomes of a population of living bacteria, Shipman, S. L., Nivala, J., Macklis, J. D. & Church, G. M. Nature, July 12, 2017

It’s interesting, for instance, how charcoal becomes trendy today in organic and well-being food, even if it’s been fucking up generations of miner’s lungs. Some use it as a natural way to ease stomach pain and bad digestion. I prefer its vomiting effects: it’s used as an emergency treatment for certain kinds of severe poisoning and OD’s. I like that it’s presented here in the shape of a large, family-size bread we could eat of all together, while expelling all the possible mad-driving toxins. The idea of letting go, of fluidity, of opening the valves, a joyful communal diarrhea prompted me to ask the baker how we could form a sort of orifice in the bread. He folded his arm and pushed his elbow far in the middle of the fresh dough. – The Future of Not Working, Aline Bouvy in conversation with Louise Osieka, June 5, 2017

The power of capital rests on that fiction of a present engendered by art; it is not least thanks to art that capital has become autonomous vis-à-vis politics and production. And the manifest product of this autonomy is the total aestheticization of life, politics, and (philosophical) thinking. It is in response to this aestheticization that we urgently need to consider (poetic) alternatives. – The Speculative End Of The Aesthetic Regime, Armen Avanessian, Texte Zur Kunst, Issue No. 93 / March 2014 „speculation“

Arthur Jafa, APEX_TNEG, at The MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology (ACT), on February 25, 2013 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUBm2_v5RUw

There are very recent instances where, under the law, the wearing of natural hairstyles is not protected from discrimination. (…) In any case, these gestures of using the du-rag in my practice became an entry point for me and hopefully others to better understand the implications of the multiple behaviors, attitudes, reactions, and declarations surrounding a black aesthetic. The du-rag was banned by the National Football League and National Basketball Association in America in the late 1990s / early 2000s, and I am asking why. Because when you ask everyone why, there are a million different answers that either address respectability politics or refer to its relationship to criminality. As if the du-rag was a cause and perpetuator of violence. In the end, it’s worn to protect the hair and condition its texture. It’s similar to hair rollers, which are rarely worn outside, but black folks are creative like that and asked, why not? It became subversive, and the powers that be have been trying to shut it down ever since. – Kevin Beasley, Silence is not neutral, Mousse Magazine, June 2017

Set an egg timer. Do nothing at all. Leave the timer in someone’s mailbox. Make a mental list of unusual colors to wear more often. Send it to your mother. – Yoko Ono, Self-Care Tips, The New Yorker, May 21, 2017

It is not impossible, it is even probable that I shall be able to summarize all the projects I shall ever carry out in my life under one title, which would be: “We Walk On The Planet Earth”.- stanley brouwn, A Step (1970) http://plaza.ufl.edu/kgladdys/ART6933/articles/brown1.pdf

David Claerbout in conversation with Chus Martínez at Schaulager, Basel, December 2015 – https://www.schaulager.org/de/schaulager/videoarchiv/video/7

I saw him in belt and braces. He grabbed a woman by the throat. No that was a sculpture. The sculpture had a throat. And faces broken open. That was art. Where? At Leo’s. Leo who? Leo two. Or Three. – rumors and echos about Manicomio ! (2017) by Dora Budor

Bubble Paintings, Jeff Geys at Essex Street New York, 9 April – 21 May 2017 (Contemporary Art Daily)

One form of resistance is to go dark, to stop making artwork that can in any way be represented on the platforms that facilitate these forms of recuperation. But even if you as an artist don’t post images of your work on social media, other people might. You could institute a Berghain rule and administer stickers over phone’s camera lenses upon entering an exhibition, but then, hashtags are indexable forms of language that don’t require images and are still a useful metric for brands. You could literally never show your work to anyone. You could embrace chaos and illegibility, creating visual or written work that is non-instrumentalizable, but legible across many parts over a longer period of time. This might mean making work that operates at a different tempo than that of branding and social media, work that occupies multiple sites and forms, work that fights for the complexity of identity (as artist or otherwise) and form, and believes in a creaturely capacity for patience with a maximum dedication to understanding. – Dena Yago, on Ketamine and Added Value, e-flux, May 2017